Acolyte rods ??

associatedmatt

Well-known member
Have been thinking about these rods and been in a tackle shop for a look and wiggle and I like them all !

I want a float rod with a bit of power not for big carp no that's what i would use my avons for . But for tench fishing and got a trip to anglers paradise in the summer so would probally pick up smaller carp and koi ,orf etc .

I'm stuck between the 12ft carp waggler or the 13ft plus float rod .

The 12ft carp rod handles 7lb line and the 13ft plus is 6 lb .

Anyone had the experience to use both ?

Regards , matt

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tigger

Well-known member
I use both of those acolytes and imo the 13ft plus rod is deffo the more powerfull of the two. I can't weigh up those upper line ratings to be honest as they don't make sense to me.
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
You are both being a bit too literal in your readings of the line ratings. The 12' Carp Waggler is 4 to 7lb+. The 13' Plus is 4 to 6lb+. The + could mean anything. The hooklength ratings on Drennan rods are usually a little less vague and may indicate the power of the rod better. However, simply reading line readings and rod descriptions/names is invariably a dodgy way to choose a rod.
 

tigger

Well-known member
You are both being a bit too literal in your readings of the line ratings. The 12' Carp Waggler is 4 to 7lb+. The 13' Plus is 4 to 6lb+. The + could mean anything. The hooklength ratings on Drennan rods are usually a little less vague and may indicate the power of the rod better. However, simply reading line readings and rod descriptions/names is invariably a dodgy way to choose a rod.
I'm not going off what's printed on the rod Chris, i'm going off how it performs when playing fish. There's no doubt in my mind that the 13ft plus is a more powerfull rod.
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
I'm not going off what's printed on the rod Chris, i'm going off how it performs when playing fish. There's no doubt in my mind that the 13ft plus is a more powerfull rod.
I know you have both, but you have said that you can't weigh up the upper line ratings. You've not included the magic "+" in your post. There is no upper limit on the mainline ratings because of it. A cop out by Drennan for using it, but the bare figures without it mean very little. Even with it included, it's a fairly open ended thing that's open to interpretation. Anything from 7lb 1oz or greater is both 6lb+ and 7lb+. There's nothing in the figures, with or without the "+", to suggest that one rod is more powerful than the other. Anyone that thinks there is, is taking the figures too literally.
 

tigger

Well-known member
Imo a rod should have a line rating that will snap before the rod does, so you can't make an error in how much pressure you put on it and cause it to snap.
As you say, those ratings are bullshine and I don't get why when they do their tests with prototype rods they can't pinpoint an exact breaking strain that going to snap before the blank....surely it would be easy enough to do with the fancy machines they use!?
 

wetthrough

Well-known member
I doubt there are any manufacturers with the bottle to put a realistic max line rating on their rods. Who's going to buy a rod with a max line rating of 3lb when you can buy one that says 6lb?
 

associatedmatt

Well-known member
I can see i opened a can of worms here !

Forget the line ratings at the moment , most my float fishing for tench and comercial sized carp is done with 6lb so both rods will cope with the line , and I either fish straight through or a 4lb bottom .

But what are the differences between the 2 rods except the extra foot ? I see they seem to keep bending and bending and bending oh and perhaps more bending without breaking and I have heard people fishing a locked up clutch and just let the rod do the work . Not my method though , I play with a clutch or backwind .

Had another waggle of the 2 rods today when went to get my dad a birthday presant and even the chap in the shop couldn't tell me what the diffrence was .

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tigger

Well-known member
I can see i opened a can of worms here !

Forget the line ratings at the moment , most my float fishing for tench and comercial sized carp is done with 6lb so both rods will cope with the line , and I either fish straight through or a 4lb bottom .

Not really, i've used both in the last fortnight and have given you my opinion.
I used 6lb straight through, wether I used a gut bottom would be determined by the target species, venue etc.
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
But what are the differences between the 2 rods except the extra foot ?

Had another waggle of the 2 rods today when went to get my dad a birthday presant and even the chap in the shop couldn't tell me what the diffrence was.
Put it this way, when the 11 and 12' rods were first rumoured, I heard that they were going to be called Acolyte Pluses. At the time they came out there wasn't a lighter version of either. By the time they appeared in tackle shops, the 11 and 12' rods had "Acolyte Carp Waggler" on them. Since then Drennan have also released lighter 11 and 12' Acolytes that just happen to be labelled as Acolyte Ultras.

I don't have them all, so can't say for sure. However, if you pretend that the Acolyte Carp Waggler rods are just Acolyte Pluses with a different name, then there would be both Acolyte Ultras and Pluses from 11' right up to 15'.
 

nottskev

Well-known member
I doubt there are any manufacturers with the bottle to put a realistic max line rating on their rods. Who's going to buy a rod with a max line rating of 3lb when you can buy one that says 6lb?
Not trying to catch you out - but there are reasons to buy the rod with the lower line rating, depending on what you want it for. For instance and I'm just picking a rod that happens to have line rec's on the butt, a 14' rod I have, built for Leslies of Luton on a Harrison blank, says for lines from 1-3lb. It's a light action rod, for old-school roach and bream etc, and I wouldn't dream of putting even 4lb line on it. But its action is far superior, when fishing very light, to some other float rods I have which can be used with stronger lines. And I have others of a similarly "narrow" range of operation. I can see though that the market for such specialised light line gear is reduced now that commercial carp are a norm.
 

Richox12

Well-known member
Imo a rod should have a line rating that will snap before the rod does, so you can't make an error in how much pressure you put on it and cause it to snap.
Unfortunately if that were done the line ratings quoted would be very low - maybe only a 1lb on a light float rod (Ultra) and so that would put everyone off buying them.
 

Richox12

Well-known member
Put it this way, when the 11 and 12' rods were first rumoured, I heard that they were going to be called Acolyte Pluses. At the time they came out there wasn't a lighter version of either. By the time they appeared in tackle shops, the 11 and 12' rods had "Acolyte Carp Waggler" on them. Since then Drennan have also released lighter 11 and 12' Acolytes that just happen to be labelled as Acolyte Ultras.

I don't have them all, so can't say for sure. However, if you pretend that the Acolyte Carp Waggler rods are just Acolyte Pluses with a different name, then there would be both Acolyte Ultras and Pluses from 11' right up to 15'.
I also suspect exactly that. Just think of them as 11ft and 12ft Pluses. It's sad but true that the word Carp sells and so labeling them Plus may have resulted in fewer sales
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
Imo a rod should have a line rating that will snap before the rod does, so you can't make an error in how much pressure you put on it and cause it to snap.
There's almost zero chance of that happening. To do so would be tantamount to giving some kind of guarantee. Even if consumer law didn't see it that way, many anglers would. There's good reason why many manufacturers don't give line ratings at all. Drennan are probably the last company to persist in putting line ratings on their blanks. Daiwa still tend to put them in their catalogues/website, but most manufacturers don't bother at all.

Besides, there are still too many vaguaries even if they all did give more accurate line ratings. We all know that there can be huge variations in the real breaking strains of lines that are labelled as being (for example) 6lb. That's before you even consider inconsistencies between ostensibly identical blanks/rods.

I doubt there are any manufacturers with the bottle to put a realistic max line rating on their rods. Who's going to buy a rod with a max line rating of 3lb when you can buy one that says 6lb?
Many wouldn't, but some still would. For a lot of my fishing, I'd much prefer to be using a much more appropriate lighter rated rod. Naturally, much depends upon the type of fishing an individual does, but a stronger rod is not the answer to every angling situation.
 

tigger

Well-known member
I also suspect exactly that. Just think of them as 11ft and 12ft Pluses. It's sad but true that the word Carp sells and so labeling them Plus may have resulted in fewer sales
Well, if they are plus's they're not as powerfull as the 13ft and 14ft plus's.
I used to have the 11ft carp waggler alao and I did like it but again it was more delicate than the longer rods, including the 12ft carp waggler!
 

associatedmatt

Well-known member
I wouldn't lock a rod up either with a tench or carp on .

Going back to tiger , would you say the 12ft rod is capable to land carp to 12 - 15 lb ?

12ft fits in my Holdal better than the 13

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tigger

Well-known member
I wouldn't lock a rod up either with a tench or carp on .

Going back to tiger , would you say the 12ft rod is capable to land carp to 12 - 15 lb ?

12ft fits in my Holdal better than the 13

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I think that depends on the venue as any rod will bring them in if there's room to play them. I have accidentally had carp to 15lb whilst fishing for tench on my 13ft plus in a snaggy peg (large reed beds all around in a small/tight peg) and bullied them but with the rod bent round more than I would imagine most would dare to.
 

associatedmatt

Well-known member
I think that depends on the venue as any rod will bring them in if there's room to play them. I have accidentally had carp to 15lb whilst fishing for tench on my 13ft plus in a snaggy peg (large reed beds all around in a small/tight peg) and bullied them but with the rod bent round more than I would imagine most would dare to.
Yes , I realise that , but always the case playing them out in open water .

It's a shame they don't do a 12ft plus

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Richox12

Well-known member
Well, if they are plus's they're not as powerfull as the 13ft and 14ft plus's.
I used to have the 11ft carp waggler alao and I did like it but again it was more delicate than the longer rods, including the 12ft carp waggler!
Maybe because different length rods in a family will behave slighty different. Remember the 14ft, for example, has another 2ft of stiff carbon above the handle which the 12ft doesn't have so it will feel different.
 

associatedmatt

Well-known member
Could well be right there , I can see the difence with the 12ft ultra and carp waggler but is the 12ft carp waggler the same as the plus but re named and a foot shorter ?

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