Angling books that should have been written

The Monk

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The history of the organised big fish movement

probably requires a number of writers in the know to complete such a work, for the early days the late Eric Hodson could have written this one, I can only think of one other person who is still alive and qualifies to write such a work from first hand experience. Ron Clay of course who in 1962 voiced and implemented his ideas began a chain of events that is still with us today. Some say it would have happened anyway, the point is it didnt of course.
 

Peter Jacobs

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I can only think of one other person who is still alive and qualifies to write such a work from first hand experience
. . . and therein lies the rub Nick.

To write and sell a book one has to have an intended reading audience in mind, as you say, most if not all of the originators are no longer with us.

As for today's middle aged and young anglers, I would bet that the majority just wouldn't be interested enough to buy the book.

Today's book market is more allied to the 'how to' or 'how I did it' type of books, and even those struggle to break even financially.

Just my thougts, of course, others may differ . . . . . . . .
 

guest61

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The history of the organised big fish movement
probably requires a number of writers in the know to complete such a work, for the early days the late Eric Hodson could have written this one, I can only think of one other person who is still alive and qualifies to write such a work from first hand experience. Ron Clay of course who in 1962 voiced and implemented his ideas began a chain of events that is still with us today. Some say it would have happened anyway, the point is it didnt of course.
The other question is, can the person who is qualified to write actually write? Having said this, would the book be a true history of the organised big fish movement or the big fish movement as viewed through the eyes of the author(s) whilst 'bigging up' his/their mates and books that they have read? I'd suggest for every regular face in the big fish angling media there are many others keeping quiet and catching big fish without seeking the Drennan cup, Korda sponsorship or seeking a dinner date with Dean Macey.
 

The Monk

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. . . and therein lies the rub Nick.

To write and sell a book one has to have an intended reading audience in mind, as you say, most if not all of the originators are no longer with us.

As for today's middle aged and young anglers, I would bet that the majority just wouldn't be interested enough to buy the book.

Today's book market is more allied to the 'how to' or 'how I did it' type of books, and even those struggle to break even financially.

Just my thougts, of course, others may differ . . . . . . . .
Yes possibly Peter, I`m not sure how well Kevin Cliffords revised history of carp fishing is doing, these things are without doubt aimed at a specialist markets of course, but I still feel they should be in print, so much recent history gets lost of course, but sadly today its all about financial reward.

---------- Post added at 10:16 ---------- Previous post was at 10:10 ----------

The other question is, can the person who is qualified to write actually write? Having said this, would the book be a true history of the organised big fish movement or the big fish movement as viewed through the eyes of the author(s) whilst 'bigging up' his/their mates and books that they have read? I'd suggest for every regular face in the big fish angling media there are many others keeping quiet and catching big fish without seeking the Drennan cup, Korda sponsorship or seeking a dinner date with Dean Macey.
The truth is out there, many of us still have original documents and mini histories and early magazines and newsletters, I still have the first BCSG newsletters, the first NAC and NASG documentation from the pre movement days, and many authors still use ghost writers of course
 

guest61

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The truth is out there, many of us still have original documents and mini histories and early magazines and newsletters, I still have the first BCSG newsletters, the first NAC and NASG documentation from the pre movement days, and many authors still use ghost writers of course
The truth is out there... ghost writers..? - Sounds like a job for Mulder and Scully :D
 

andreagrispi

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Alan Wilson should have written about his angling career - what a book that would have been.
 

The Monk

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There must be a few of these written in Polish that only require translation. :wh :wh :wh
Hahaha I`m sure there has, lol, how are you Woody

---------- Post added at 11:41 ---------- Previous post was at 11:40 ----------

I'm currently penning a book about BIG MOVEMENTS. Who else could contribute?
That should be a cracker Matt, I think we are all looking forward to that one mate, lol
 

Peter Jacobs

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Peter has made a valid point but there is a market for such work; for example through mPress the publishers of Graham Marsden's excellent Angling Essays.
I don't think that you are comparing like-for-like there though Paul.

On the one hand you have a very interesting collection of diverse topics and articles, collated into a bound form that would probably appeal to a much larger audience than to a rather limited readership oh the history of how they organised the big fish movement.

The same goes for Kevin Clifford's revised history of Carp fishing, which firstly would sell based on the original and secondly to the Carp fraternity - in truth I really don't see any similarity.
 

chub_on_the_block

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Bob Buteux wrote a couple recollecting the times of the Chilterns Specimen Group in the 1960s-80s, most of whom are now sadly passed on.

Although i havent read these books (and theres the third due out next year) I am tempted for the local interest as much as anything. I am a bit sensitive reading about the activities of charismatic anglers in their prime when they are no longer with us. It reminds me rather too much that we all have only a limited time at our swims.
 

dezza

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I have attempted to put a few things right by having an article published in the magazine: "Classic Angling" on the early days of specimen hunting and how the National Association of Specimen Groups was formed.

In addition I have had articles published in "Carp Talk", (which tells of the early days of the bolt rig), Angling Star, and two chapters in the books: "My Days with ****", and "Angling Encounters", which tells of my experiences with a true angling legend - Ray Webb. In this chapter, reference is made to the formation of the Northern Specimen Group.

These small contributions have been successful and have given me a little income, which is always nice when you are a pensioner living on a fixed income.

Certainly I would tackle a book on the Foundations of Specimen Hunting if maybe The Monk would give me a little help. He certainly is qualified to write at least two chapters in such a tome.

And so is Kevin Clifford, who's "A History of Carp Fishing Re-Visited", is doing quite well I am informed.

**** Walker and others mentioned in articles that there was little money in writing fishing books. This is why Walker wrote very few books. In fact many of his books were compilations of articles which do pay decent money, or they did in the 60s and 70s.
 
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Mark Wintle

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It's interesting to see that many think that 'big fish angling' started in the 60s! When I researched 'Big Roach' it became clear that specialised big fish angling easily predates this era even if it has little 'organisation'. Bill Penney was a very successful angler of the 30s who through dedication and skill was enormously successful for big roach and deservedly caught a record. How much the 'organisation' contributes to success I don't know but I bet that for every 'organised' angler there are ten more equally as successful that aren't in or never belonged to any group. Mention of Alan Wilson reminds me that he has an interview in Big Fish from Famous Waters, and that I also write about some of his roach fishing exploits in Big Roach.

As for the economics of specialist books, all I can say is that it is very very tough out this, especially this last year. You'd be surprised how few some angling books are selling; I don't know all the figures but I do know which ones have really struggled. Unless a book can recover its costs plus make a profit then it isn't worth doing; no publisher is in it to lose money. Self publish like LuLu offers another route with mush less financial risk though plenty of work involved.
 

dezza

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In his book: "Angling - Fundamental Principles", Prof. Barrie Rickards points out that anglers, as a group, do not read!

Mark Wintle would have the figures, but the circulation of Angling Times is small, compared with what it was in the 60s. I remember quite well that virtually every gents hairdresser, and doctors and dentists waiting rooms had a couple of fishing magazines, including the Angling Times for people to read.

Not now of course.
 

guest61

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In his book: "Angling - Fundamental Principles", Prof. Barrie Rickards points out that anglers, as a group, do not read!

Mark Wintle would have the figures, but the circulation of Angling Times is small, compared with what it was in the 60s. I remember quite well that virtually every gents hairdresser, and doctors and dentists waiting rooms had a couple of fishing magazines, including the Angling Times for people to read.

Not now of course.
There is also a suggestion that anglers as a group don't write, although there will be exceptions.

I can remember when the Angling Times had articles that were worth reading.
 

dezza

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It's interesting to see that many think that 'big fish angling' started in the 60s! When I researched 'Big Roach' it became clear that specialised big fish angling easily predates this era even if it has little 'organisation'. Bill Penney was a very successful angler of the 30s who through dedication and skill was enormously successful for big roach and deservedly caught a record. How much the 'organisation' contributes to success I don't know but I bet that for every 'organised' angler there are ten more equally as successful that aren't in or never belonged to any group. Mention of Alan Wilson reminds me that he has an interview in Big Fish from Famous Waters, and that I also write about some of his roach fishing exploits in Big Roach.
Angling for big fish certainly goes back a long time. Certainly the likes of JW Martin, H.T. Sheringham, J.H.R. Bazley, Wilf Cutting and Henry Coxon wrote about big fish captures, and often mentioned their own.

It wasn't until the mid 60s that big fish hunting groups became "organised" into the NASG. Eric Hodson was responsible for that.
 

chub_on_the_block

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Is there any book written about the history of angling clubs and club/match fishing?. I was in about 3 South London clubs at various times in teh early 80s and knew of a few more of which there is no record at all these days as they have long gone. That whole era of the Sunday coach trip would be fertile ground for stories and recollections i think. It would be nice if there was a website directory of clubs with links to going concerns and their websites and where former members could enter their recollections or maybe get back in touch with people.
 
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