Blue Green Algea

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ray bewick

Guest
The water I'm fishing suffers from BGA. At the moment 50+ % is affected by drifting algea.
Questions - in the forums opinion
1)does it affect the fish
2)does it affect our ability to catch
3)What are the future environmental problems possible that may affect Angling
 
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Ray Bewick

Guest
Ha! this ones got ya!

- no replies, no one else knows. Ergo i'm a genius and know everything. Oh God! - yes sir Mr ray.
 

Colin Brett

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Sorry only just found your mail!

Blue Green is highly toxic when heavily concentrated. In other words dont drink it! Supposed to have killed dogs and sheep at Rutland?? Because it cuts off light weed growth is soon limited and dies off, possibly kills invertabrates. I never saw a dead fish at either Rutland or Grafham because of BG.

Hope this helps? If you require further info get in touch with AW at Brampton near Huntingdon

Colin
 
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Ray Bewick

Guest
Thanks Colin

I have not visited the water in question since the recent end of the hot weather. The Trout feed in it but the question really is - should trout be put into a water where their life is potentially limited by the algea dying off & de-oxygenating the water. The coarse fish by the water thrive!.

regards
 
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Rob Brownfield

Guest
Ray, I fished my local water on Monday evening. Tuesday morning, 2am..I was on the bog! Both ends were playing up...the only thing I could put this down too was the BGA that was in the margins. I got it on my hands etc...so maybe that made me ill.

Nasty stuff
 
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Ray Bewick

Guest
Interestingly prior to the recent rapid increase of BGA;due to the hot weather there were 16 -20 young swans on the water, they had all gone on my last visit!.

The water for this (water supply) reservoir is pumped in from the adjacent river; they are not allowed / do not pump in when the rivers in flood, i am told because of the highly nutrified state of the water.

Rob - Stop nutrifing the water. On longer sessions (coarse) I always used to take a mini first aid kit which included Imodium, Paracetamol and Gaviscon, saved my bacon not to say my underwear on several occassions.
 

Colin Brett

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Rob,

Probably something other than BGA. I have never had any problems with health after contact with it, but there again you may have a weaker stomach than this old git! As I said before don't drink it or brush your teeth with it, just take sensible precautions. NOW WAS YOUR HANDS!!

Re. putting trout or any fish into it, I don't think it does fish any harm at all. It may kill off some of its food chain but there is always something for them to eat. Plus in our climate it doesn't last long anyway, a good wind soon mixes it up and dilutes it. Having said that at Rutland I have seen it as a 2foot thick crust up by Fantasy Island!

Colin
 
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Ray Bewick

Guest
Colin - This res is only 40 acres max depth 20ft in one place another 'hole' at 16 footish, average depth 6 to 8 ft, so its certainly no Rutland :-( . Basiclly its concrete bowl with liner; for all that it's a very pleasent place to fish apart from the BGA. As for mixing it up it doesn't really happen, the wind pushes it to the windward bank and it then just thickens and thickens when it reaches the undertow it then pushes some of it back up wind , when it that thick we're approaching 70+% coverage.
The Trout do feed in it!, its just that the flies, knots, line etc all pick up slimmy clumps of it making presentation a nightmare.
 
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Andy Rooke

Guest
just thought i would say on this isssue, that on our trout farm we have a small fishing lake with this thick green algae in it. its a bloody nightmare , catching your flies annd also leader knots ect. i have seen the fish feeding in it and as far as i can see that it has not killed the fish. the only harm that this stuff does on the farm is block the screens, which cause the outlets to get blocked and starve the pond of oxygen and fresh running water which results in fish kills. cheers and good luck with your fishing
andy
 
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Ray Bewick

Guest
Andy - interesting, have you tried bails of barley straw in the margins, the theory is that as the straw breaks down it encourages the growth of beasties that feed on the algea.

thanks for the info
 
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Andy Rooke

Guest
ray at the moment we have to use a sein net to stop the algea form blocking up the screens. at a local fishery we supply (dever springs) they use this method it works to good effect, but it does not look that pretty in the lake as you can imagine. cheers
andy
 
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Tim Sidney

Guest
Ray, I am in currently negotiating for the lease of the fishing rights on a reservoir in Sussex. I was concerned to find that the water was covered in what I assumed was BGA. Before I proceeded further with the purchase, I did a bit of research
Via the environmental agency, the web and an independent water scientist. I found that the Environmental agency are very helpful and they have a booklet which they will send to you free of charge about BGA. I hope this helps you, if you require any further information please do not hesitate to contact me.
 
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Ray Bewick

Guest
Andy - once again thanks

Tim - Thanks, I shall obtain the booklet. I'm intrigued by your opening line. May I mail you off list?.

regards
 
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