Confused about hook length strengths on river. . ( Ribble )

Just Paul 1

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Can anyone please tell me, why when course fishing do anglers use a stronger main line than the hook length but on rivers the majority of anglers use a stronger hook length than the main line? Just dont get it.
 

peter crabtree

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I have heard the Ribble has a rocky bottom and strong hooklinks are necessary to avoid breakages due to abrasion on the rocks.
Just guessing but If you were to keep to the norm of lighter hooklink, but had to use say a 8lb hooklink, that would necessitate going up to 10lb mainline, which on a standard coarse fishing rod could restrict casting distance or hamper trotting gear due to the size of the rod rings.
 

stevejay

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Also if fishing faster flowing rivers, having a lighter (thinner) main line will mean you can hold bottom with a slightly lighter feeder. For barbel, and many other specimen fishing, many use braided hook lengths, being more supple, and these are usually only available in fairly strong breaking strains. Not necessarily the best for the Ribble though as it is snaggy as mentioned above.
 

theartist

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Any river can have serious snags, I've never got the heavier hooklength principle, I've seen it mentioned in some specimen articles, surely it leaves more line in the water when there's a breakage though?

There's swims I fish on other rivers where I'm always snagging on others line, often connected to a swivel or leads that are supposed to break free, , the snag tends to win no matter how heavy you go.
 

Just Paul 1

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So really , if say for instance I'm using 12lb mainline , I may as well use a 8 or 10lb hook length. . Ok, thanks every one.
 

Paul C

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I never do. I use 12lb mainline and 9lb Fluoro hooklength when feeder fishing. If you snag, which you will on there, you want the hooklength to go and retrieve the feeder / lead.
With the rocks and boulders though it can be the feeder that snags, so free running rigs are a must so nothing is left attached to the feeder.

I use the same principal float fishing with a lower breaking strain and diameter hooklength, although that's more for presentation as it's rare to snag on the float.
 

pelamid

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I fish the river Lot in France. There are many cliffs along the river and so many weirs, you can just imagine the boulders and rubble along the river bed!

Took me some time but I now have a setup that does not normally lose tackle or fish. It's perhaps overly strong but it does not restrict casting distance as the mainline is braid.

So, mainline decent 30lb braid. Then about 8' of 15 lb fluorocarbon joined to braid with an Albright knot. Trace to hook will normally be 10 lb fluorocarbon. Weight mounted on a big eye swivel - attached in a variety of ways but always allowing for its not tethering a fish on breakage of mainline.

In summer I may step down to 20 lb braid and 10 lb leader with lighter trace, but as there is a good chance of a big carp I have to pick my swims carefully to risk the lighter lines.

Some swims I simply cannot use feeders due to rocks, there it's pva bags to deliver the extras.

I used to be a sea angler on the east coast of Scotland, now feeling quite at home with this level of freshwater tackle! One of the worse snag pits...

IMG_20200711_193517370.jpg
 

markg

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Just thought I would mention this, in an old book I was reading they attached a plastic bottle to the line when snagged, I assume this floats down and can pull the rig free from a snag, not sure if they filled it water as well so it had a bit of weight but either way I can see how it could work. I don't fish snaggy generally just silt but if I was fishing a snaggy river I think it might be worth taking a plastic bottle with a clip attached to it. I am sure it would free the tackle in some situations,.
 

stevejay

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Never tried the bottle approach, but have freed a few snagged feeders on the even by feeding out a large bow as the current takes that downstream and pulls the feeder from a different angle than from where you are fishing.
 

markg

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Never tried the bottle approach, but have freed a few snagged feeders on the even by feeding out a large bow as the current takes that downstream and pulls the feeder from a different angle than from where you are fishing.
I think that's what the bottle does just gives it a bit more pull.
 

theartist

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I read on another forum about using a heavy metal ring clipped on and slid down the line attached to some cord, give the cord a tug and it could free you from the snag, probably the same principle as a bouyant bottle.

They suggested a nose ring used for bulls was the best although I assume it would be good practise not to use one that was still attached to said bovine.
 

markg

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In sea fishing these are often used to lift the lead when reeling in over snaggy beaches and rocks. I think a smaller version could be made to work in a snaggy river.
1614098462950.png
 

whitty

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One thing that must be considered here,whilst barbel fishing a good,strong,abrasion resistant line is imperative,on any river,so when you put say twenty inches of different line(12lb when you use say 10lb mainline)will still break before the 10lb,purely because of stretch over length....
 

Keith M

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In sea fishing these are often used to lift the lead when reeling in over snaggy beaches and rocks. I think a smaller version could be made to work in a snaggy river.
View attachment 13431

I have some black plastic vanes; similar in shape; in amongst my Carp bits and pieces which are supposed to lift your lead off of a snaggy bottom on the retrieve if you speed up your retrieve; but I’ve never needed to use them. I bought them ‘just incase’ many years ago when I was fishing a lake which had lots of gravel bars.

I remember Ivan Marks asking me about them when he was looking through my Carp tacklebox a couple of years before he passed away.

Keith
 
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liphook

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A good dod of brown/green plastiscene on the feeder or lead is way better than the likes plastic vanes etc in my experience. You can mould it to give you that lead lift effect and it helps prevent tackle loss as it deforms on getting stuck
 
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