Does bucket size matter for perch livebaits

Tree123

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2018
Messages
118
Reaction score
11
Location
Ramsgate
Silly question.
Other then obvious less space does it matte What size bucket I use for my livebaits.

As atm I'm using a 5l bucket. But if I swap down to 2.5l. I can get rid having to carry my rucksack.
I run a pump and change the water when I move swim. But will affect the bait if there bait cramped.?
 

Aknib

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2019
Messages
961
Reaction score
418
Location
Isle of Onamower
I suppose it's all relative to what size livebaits you are using and how long you intend keeping them in there.

I use the round Stillwater carrier with the lift out plastic cage which saves having to chase the baits around in there when getting one out, can't remember the make of the pump though...

slb.JPG

I can't see how I could drop down on size and really see much benefit although water is bloody heavy stuff to cart around, if I were using very small baits like minnows then I would consider it if I could get a suitable aerated carrier but anything bigger and I'm inclined to stick with what I've got.

Would it be an option to use what you've already got but not fill it as much when using smaller baits, or maybe pour some of the water out before moving swims and top it back up again in your new swim?
 

Tree123

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2018
Messages
118
Reaction score
11
Location
Ramsgate
Well normally catch 10 -15 livebaits to last me a session. Normally no longer hen 2inches. I spend all day swim hoping all want to be as light as possible and being able to put everything in one bucket (ie live baits maggots tackle)all helps that.

And lugging that around can be a pain I had one like the one above for piking. I brought a little aquarium net to savage to chase live baits again.

I mean as long as I have the pump and change the water no harm should come to the livebaits even if they are a bit cramped

I guess. I'll just give a try if they all die
Too soon. Then I'll have to go back to original way
 
Last edited:

bullet

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 10, 2011
Messages
627
Reaction score
350
Location
Devon
Definitely, Mike.
If nothing else they're good for Shrimping on holiday.
 

dorsetsteve

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 22, 2015
Messages
168
Reaction score
46
The surface area of the bucket is more important than the buckets volume. The greater the surface area, the more efficient the oxygen exchange process. Of course an aerator will help too.
This. Oxygen and gas exchange is primarily a function of surface area, it’s the interface and breaking the layer between the liquid and the atmosphere that does the job. What the volume will do however is help dilute the build up of Ammonia.

The air pump is actually an inefficient way to increase oxygen levels in the water, as only a tiny portion of that air becomes dissolved oxygen. It’s greater contribution is the distribution to the surface area, ripples create peaks and through effectively elongating the surface area. So it’s better than nothing.

It is in fact Ammonia that your enemy, as those fish sit in that volume they produce Ammonia which becomes toxic and the oxygen crash and death or damage caused by both is started here. The air will not stop the Ammonia build up, in fact it could theoretically make it worse.

Far better solution would be to regularly change the water, or leave the bucket in the margin with holes to allow that water to mix.
 

Roger Johnson 2

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
134
Reaction score
154
When live baiting for pike I would stretch a net over the top of the bucket, secured with an elastic cord, when in the swim keep the bucket, tethered by a length of clothes line, in the water until a bait was needed, between swims I’d keep just enough water in the bucket to cover their backs.... result lively baits and light buckets!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Tree123

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2018
Messages
118
Reaction score
11
Location
Ramsgate
This. Oxygen and gas exchange is primarily a function of surface area, it’s the interface and breaking the layer between the liquid and the atmosphere that does the job. What the volume will do however is help dilute the build up of Ammonia.

The air pump is actually an inefficient way to increase oxygen levels in the water, as only a tiny portion of that air becomes dissolved oxygen. It’s greater contribution is the distribution to the surface area, ripples create peaks and through effectively elongating the surface area. So it’s better than nothing.

It is in fact Ammonia that your enemy, as those fish sit in that volume they produce Ammonia which becomes toxic and the oxygen crash and death or damage caused by both is started here. The air will not stop the Ammonia build up, in fact it could theoretically make it worse.

Far better solution would be to regularly change the water, or leave the bucket in the margin with holes to allow that water to mix.
Yeah when I move swim I always swap the water.
 
Top