Fish theft

rayner

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I can understand your mood even though it sounds harsh. How could the vermin be stopped, especially in our country that mollycoddles the criminal element we have.
Fines don't work it's time for a more measured approach, IE wipe the barstewards out even their families to prevent future fallout. Poachers breed poachers.?
 

Ray Roberts

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Ha, ha, capital punishment for nicking a fish. Why not brand them on the forehead with a red hot iron or put them in the stocks?


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rayner

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Branding would not change their mentality, the only way is to end them by hanging or throat slashing. We need to get medieval on their ar$es
? the no littering emoji is in place of a no-poaching emoji. I can't find an emoji for hanging or throat slashing.
Our emojis need updating.
 
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peter crabtree

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rayner

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Sounds good, if you can ever get the police to respond. The police don't respond to house break-ins at least not in my own experience, well they did after the burglars had left the property they had broken in to.
If you consider capital punishment a tad harsh, the fish stealers could be offered the alternative of drinking a pint of drain cleaner. Either way, it would cut poaching to non-existent.
 
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Fishing without permission & fish theft are criminal offences, which the police are duty-bound to deal with. You may find that because police officers rarely deal with or perhaps have never dealt with offences of this kind, they are generally inexperienced in this part of the Theft Act 1968. So we find that we generally have to provide them with additional information to overcome this area of uncertainty, when we report incidents to the police.

I'm a retired police officer and have done a lot of work in this particular field. What most people understand as 'poaching' is actually defined legally as 'theft of fishing rights' and is covered specifically by Sec. 22 Theft Act 1968.

The comment above; about police officers not normally being called to deal with this sort offence is absolutely correct and explains why, on occasions, complainants don't get the response they would hope for.

In 2010, whilst serving as head bailiff for a local angling club, I wrote a document entitled 'Guidance Notes For Police Personnel' which detailed the various situations they might be called to deal with and explained the different legislation that falls within their remit and within the remit of the EA (both have quite different roles to play and don't take on matters that are the responsibility of the other - so you need to get the right one). The idea of producing the 'Guidance Notes' was that civilian bailiffs could keep a copy in their cars and then, if they found themselves needing police assistance to deal with an incident, they could support the officers attending with all the information they might need.

I know that, at the time, my document was circulated widely by the EA and that a lot of angling clubs and fishery owners now have it at their disposal. If anyone on FM would like a copy I'd be happy to supply it via Email.
 

johnbaz

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Hi

I've not been fishing in years but I recall getting to the canal at Tinsley in Sheffield when three 15-ish year old foreign lads came down with an armful of netting, I asked them what they were doing, They replied in very broken English that were were fishing, I said they needed a license and that they can't use a net, It's illegal, The gobbyest one of the three said he had one so I asked to see it, after argueing for a while they dropped the net and started walking off, As soon as they were far enough away they showed that they'd learned all the Brit swear words!!

It occurred to me that I couldn't see my car from where I was going to fish, Didn't want to get back after fishing to find my tyres slashed so I went to the Rother at Catcliffe instead!, I took their net and cut it in to small bits an binned it, It half filled the flippin bin!! (y)

I've packed in work now and am looking forwards to getting back in to splodgin again! :cool::cool:
 
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Hii...An individual may have the rights to take the fish, but he does not exercise rights of ownership over them until they are killed, captured, or tamed. Stealing fish is contrary to section 1 of the Theft Act 1968. The Act also creates poaching offenses to cover situations where wild fish are taken fishing hook.

Taking wild fish from a river is poaching, but removing a dead fish from a fisherman's car boot is theft. Taking fish from a lake stocked for an angling society could be theft, depending on whether the fish has a sufficient element of freedom in a large lake to be considered wild. Fish confined by fences to a small section of running water might be subject to theft. Removal of fish from keep-nets, fishing nets, and traps is theft.

Have a look at Sec.22 Theft Act 1968. This is the legislation which specifically covers 'theft of fishing rights' and is much easier to prove than Sec.1. I've used it successfully quite a number of times whilst serving as a police officer and, subsequently, head bailiff with a local angling club.
 
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