Float making.

purplepeanut007

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Thanks m8,

But as for doing up a house.........I will leave that to the pros......lmao :)

---------- Post added at 07:45 ---------- Previous post was at 05:46 ----------

PEANUTS FISHING ADVENTURES - THE RIVER IRWELL AND BEYOND.: HANDCRAFTED FLOATS - 2017

These two stick floats are for the leaders of my club.
Salford Friendly Anglers .

About Us

For all their endeavours on our behalf.

"Sticking " . . . . . Lol . . .
With my new metallic thread we have two
"Retro Stick Floats with a political theme !!!!!!!!!!!

One for

"Tory Boy"

&
One for

"Red Ken" 😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂



 

purplepeanut007

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I decided to give one of my . .

" Disgorging Stick Floats "

The metallic thread treatment.
I am really please with this as I think the metallic red thread pulls the whole float together.



 
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purplepeanut007

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Here are some long and some extra long

" Sneaky Lifters " .

These are for crucian fishing in deep water.
Rather unusual !!!!!

I hope you like them.

For more picks hit the link above. 😊




 

Tee-Cee

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Your 'sneaky lifter' floats almost identical to some I picked up in South Korea back in the 1980's and I have used them with pleasure all these years ( with renewed varnishing from time to time!). Some I have almost a foot long and all excellent for crucian/roach fishing in deep water, as you say....
Mine, and this because the S Korean company found them easier to produce in this way, have the same very long antenna but instead of 'painting' the rings different colours they used different colour rings made of very thin plastic material pushed down the antenna. It sounds crude but the floats work beautifully and no sensitivity is lost at all, especially in deep water with a bit of chop on the surface. The antennas I think are somewhat thinner than yours as well......

At the base of the float a short length of 'chord' (only 1mm thick or so) has been whipped to the end and 10mm of this is 'solid' - like hardened - plastic which is used like a 'peg' to fit into a length of rubber/silicon, already on the line. If you will, it works very much like the Drennan Float Attachments used these days (of which I am a big fan) and my floats collapse on strike in the same way, as Drennan explains.....

As I say, mine bought in the 1980's and still as good today - in fact I would say some of my most treasured possessions - something that doesn't normally apply to me!!

Without doubt, your float offerings are of exceptional quality and you should be rightly proud of them. Those that come from my hand are, what shall we say, a little more crude in the finishing, but function just as well because the design is thought out...

My painting tends to let me down, mainly because of the very thin black rings has been difficult to achieve with any consistency, so unless it's a 'secret' not to be divulged to strangers, how DO you manage to get the black 'line' around the float so thin??

Excellent thread by the OP, though....................


ps One of these days I will find out what the Korean 'scribble' (down the side of the bodies) means, in English..............
 
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tigger

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Tee-Cee, I think a lot of float makers whip on coloured thread rather than paint their floats and then varnish over the float.
 

Bluenose

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I've seen some ace home made gear down the years here, but these are right up there and are sensational.. have you made a video mate?
 

s63

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Got these from Mike late last year, a long wait but well worth it. Still yet to be wetted but if they can help catch a fish even half as pretty as they are I will be a happy bunny.

 

Mark Wintle

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Historical BTW - Which Avon was it named after? ...e.g. Hampshire, Bristol, Warks, ....? :confused:
I've seen it said that it was named after the Warwickshire Avon. Certainly the concept of adding a cork body to a simple bird quill to increase weight carrying is very old. Captain Parker's Avon float (1940s) was very different to our modern version as it was a swan quill with the body at the base. Topper Haskins developed his version on the Bristol Avon though few seem to know how to make his version correctly.
 
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binka

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Topper Haskins developed his version on the Bristol Avon though few seem to know how to make his version correctly.
Now there's a name I've not heard mentioned for decades.

Good old Topper, always sounded to me like a character straight out of a Crabtree storyline.

I've heard the term 'Trent Toppers' used locally in relation to old style floats and always assumed this was where it came from.
 

Mark Wintle

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Now there's a name I've not heard mentioned for decades.

Good old Topper, always sounded to me like a character straight out of a Crabtree storyline.

I've heard the term 'Trent Toppers' used locally in relation to old style floats and always assumed this was where it came from.
I think you're mixing up Topper floats with Trent TROTTERS... totally different type of float developed by Billy lane from....... an Avon.
 
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binka

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I think you're mixing up Topper floats with Trent TROTTERS... totally different type of float developed by Billy lane from....... an Avon.
No, definitely Trent Toppers Mark.

I remember them being referred to locally and I recall the name Topper Haskins in particular.

I suspect it was just a local adoption of the general term for the float which was highly suitable and widely used on the river back in the day.

Back at the time (80's) I had a work colleague from Nottingham who's second name was Harris and I always referred to him as Topper Harris due to the similarity, much to his bewilderment... I never did let on why :D

Trent Trotters were also a commonly referred to float, but I don't hear them mentioned much these days other than by the occasional individual float maker.
 

greenie62

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I've seen it said that it was named after the Warwickshire Avon. Certainly the concept of adding a cork body to a simple bird quill to increase weight carrying is very old.......
Thanks Mark - I have a vague memory of it being said to be the Warks Avon - but had formerly assumed it to be the Hampshire Avon - because of its bouyancy and ability to carry a range of chunky baits for some of the larger fish - including bunches of lobs for any 'silver tourists' that might be passing through! :eek::eek:

I also wondered if it had been called the Avon - from times gone by - as a (mis)transliteration of an Afon float - from Afon=River (Welsh) - to distinguish it as a river float rather than a still-water float.

Anyone got any other ideas? :confused:
 
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