Fly lines, weight and colour

markg

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Having acquired 3 fly rods I am looking for lines and find it confusing. What is the best colour, I imagine green is best but there are so many should it be green?
My rods have recommended weights 5-7, 6-7 and 7-9. How important is it to match these weights. Looking on eBay there are so many price ranges from about £4 to £50, is there that much difference between them?
I already have a line on one reel I have bought with these rods but I have no idea what weight it is, is there any way of telling?
What weight of fish should I be fishing for with those lines, I will probably just be having a go on a river, whats best the 5-7, 6-7 or the 7-9?
I know a bit but thought I would ask just to get a better idea, thanks.

My other question is the reel has a fly line but it looks pretty tawdry, what is the best thing to clean it with and can it be straightened and made supple again or should I change it?




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davebike

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The weight of line refers to the "casting weight" inexperienced anglers are recoended to use the higher of the range on the rod
The weeight of the line reflect what size fly you can use a heaver line caries a heaver fly at teh cost of less presentation
for still waters the 5/7 or 6/7 would be fine bit heavy for river work but possible ok fro a beginner
The 7/9 weight is heaver extrean big water / pike size
The weight of line has little input on size of fish (trout wise)
THe colour matters little many anglere add a day glow bit to the end you then have a tapered leader and a tippet the strength of that is based on the size of fish targeted
Start off with a floating line it is easier
 

Clodhopper

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Hello Mark,

As with so many things, with fly lines you tend to get what you pay for. Generally speaking, my experience is that the quality of your line is paramount - more important than, say, the quality of your reel. I think Dave is probably right when he says that, for a beginner, a line at the heavier end of the range for a rod may be helpful. However, 5-7 seems a very wide range for your lighter rod.

You can read about weight forward versus double tapered lines, and the advantages of each, on 't'internet. I have generally gone for weight-forward myself., except on my 3 wt which I use on small streams, especially when targeting coarse fish.

For the lighter weight lines (up to 6-7) I have generally favoured Cortland Sylk or Cortland 444 Classic Peach. They are pricey but give me confidence and generally last me well, despite my clumsiness. I have only recently started using heavier weight lines and am trying a couple of Rio brand.

Again, you can find stuff on cleaning lines on the internet - especially on Youtube. I don't clean mine enough and, when I do, I cut corners when I shouldn't. I just run my line of the reel into a sink full of lukewarm soapy (as in washing-up liquid) water, then rewind through a j-cloth. I should probably remove the line from the backing and give it a good soak.... but then I might put the weight forward line back on the reel the wrong way round! (doh).

In summary: I would focus on buying one really good weight-forward floating line for the best of your rods and use that whilst you learn your casting technique. In my opinion, learning to fly fish is a bit like learning to play golf: you can avoid a good deal of hard work and frustration in later life if you make sure your basic technique is as free of bad habits as possible, in the early stages. If you can afford it, have an occasional lesson. It will make a world of difference to your technique and enjoyment. Most importantly, for the first couple of years, I found as much satisfaction from improving my cast as I did from actually catching a fish. Indeed, after a decade of fly fishing, learning to 'double haul' a fishing line was one of the greatest pleasures I have derived from the pastime.

Good luck
 

S-Kippy

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IMO there is no fly rod in the world that will handle both a 5 weight and a 7 weight equally well. You might find a 6 weight suits it best....or none of the above. There is a world of difference between a 5 weight and a 7 weight line...likewise a 7 and a 9. That said a ny half decent rod ought to be able to handle lines a size up on spec ie a 7 weight rod ought to be able to cast an 8 weight....more so than a 6 weight in my experience though it depends on the action of the rod. Generally speaking the softer ( ie more through actioned) the rod the better it will handle a lighter line...but it wont cast a heavier line very well as it will collapse.

I gave up messing about with different weight rods years ago. Nowadays you'll find me fishing a 7 weight line on a 7 weight rod 95% of the time. I'll put an 8 on the same weight rod ( loads the rod quicker) if I'm sea trouting and I have a couple of winkle rods ( 4 and 5 weight) for grayling and river trout. I only ever use WF lines too....I see no advantage in fishing DT lines though if I was paying hundreds of pounds to fish for hysterical trout on the Test I might feel differently....but I'm not so all my DT lines were scrapped years ago.

I dont think colour makes a blind bit of difference. For years I avoided white lines until I started usiing Snowbees which are excellent....as are Guideline which are a pale green colour. The trout dont seem to give a damn. I've tried Cortlands but for some reason I just cannot cast them.....must be my casting style.
 

Peter Jacobs

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I’d agree a lot with the above from S-Kippy.
My sage Z axis is a 6# but it does load up well with a 7 weight line, but I also tend to use the designated weight for my rods.
 

markg

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Thanks everyone, this has given me a guide what to do. I have 4 fly rods and two reels in all. The reels have old fly lines on them that were there when I bought them that look a bit jaded and I do not know what weights they are anyway. I will dump them and buy new ones, good ones if I can. A 6 and a 8 to match 2 of the rods which should suffice my needs. The two spare rods I am not sure yet, maybe look out for another reel and new line later for one of them. I will not worry about colour but I might plump for green.
I have dabbled with a bit of fly fishing but not to any great extent and I have just fished with what was probably unbalanced and less than perfect equipment, maybe this will remedy that a bit and I will find I cast better as well.
Thanks , very helpful.
 

bullet

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Mark, Barrio fly lines are very good for the money, and the owner is very knowledgeable, so should be able to help you get the best choice for your rods.
 

markg

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Mark, Barrio fly lines are very good for the money, and the owner is very knowledgeable, so should be able to help you get the best choice for your rods.
just had a google of them, they look good to me and at about £30 my sort of price range. A wide range to choose as well in types and weights. I might go for it, thanks Bullet.
 

steve2

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In summary: I would focus on buying one really good weight-forward floating line for the best of your rods and use that whilst you learn your casting technique. In my opinion, learning to fly fish is a bit like learning to play golf: you can avoid a good deal of hard work and frustration in later life if you make sure your basic technique is as free of bad habits as possible, in the early stages. If you can afford it, have an occasional lesson. It will make a world of difference to your technique and enjoyment. Most importantly, for the first couple of years, I found as much satisfaction from improving my cast as I did from actually catching a fish. Indeed, after a decade of fly fishing, learning to 'double haul' a fishing line was one of the greatest pleasures I have derived from the pastime.

When I first started fly fishing I had lessons with a great caster, Micheal Marshall, he ironed out my errors. The cost of the lessons was money well spent. Bit like golf lesson where lessons also helped. Micheal Marshall videos are available in you tube.
 
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