Found in my garden.

  • Thread starter Graham Marsden (ACA)
  • Start date
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MarkTheSpark

Guest
They're some kind of weevil, I think, and attack my penstemon plants. But other than that, I have no idea what they are.

Each insect is about 3mm long.
 

Alan Tyler

Well-known member
A diagnostic for aphids is that they always have a pair of "exhaust pipes" on the abdomen - these often exude gluey wax to make life difficult for their predators.

These look like weevils to me; I'd never paid them much attention and looked them up in the "Bug" section of my insect book; but, no. Weevils is beetils! (Diagnostic: Hindwings modifided into hard wing-cases which meet in straight line down the middle of the back). It's the long "beak" that confused me. The position of the antennae shows that the beak is part of the head capsule, not the mouthparts; the mouthparts will be at the very tip.

There are over 40,000 species world-wide, so the next step depends on how much you need to identify them further. Certainly a dorsal view would help, but you have a smashing shot of a love triangle!
 
F

Fred Bonney

Guest
Great picture Graham,catching them on the job as well!
Looks like a Clover seed weevil,trouble is there's about 500odd weevils in the UK alone.
 
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Graham Marsden (ACA)

Guest
It's not my picture, it's Mark's. I only started the thread. (Click on the picture for details).

But I do agree about it being a great picture.
 
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The Monk

Guest
sorry Mark, great picture mate, I wonder if hes just serviced the other female whos walking away, she doesnt look too impressed though?
 
Great picture.

The creature top right clearly indicates the species.

It is an armour-plated clanger - a deviant from the the main clanger, resulting from an evolutionary accident producing a type of non soup-eating clanger. The armour plating is protection from the justifiable wrath of down-sized soup dragon communes.
 
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MarkTheSpark

Guest
Thanks for the compliments about the picture - shot in the studio (D200, Sigma 50mm macro, for all the lensheads!)under two flash heads to get depth of field - backdrop of another garden picture!

Whatever this little devil is, it eats my garden plants and makes a right mess. The sticky grubs it produces are revolting.
 
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The Monk

Guest
it might help Mark if you stop them having sex instead of photographing them while thei`re at it, next time you catch them throw a bucket of water over the little buggers?
 
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