Harrison gti and gti su?

ben10

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Anyone had much experience with either? Looking for 2 float rods to cover all my needs....stick and waggler fishing from roach through to barbel and big tench and carp.

Looked at the acolytes but have seen too many horror stories about the tips breaking.

How are the Harrison's to use? I take it one of each will cover all my float needs?

Or if anyone has a better suggestion? I'd like a matching pair I.e. From the same range if possible but will mix and match if there are better options.
 

barbelboi

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I've used the GTi for many enjoyable years (90's 15' rod with sliding rings and spliced tip). The only reason I sold it a couple of years ago (it fetched £100 on fleabay) was the weight factor for a few hours continuous trotting. I bought a 14' Accy Ultra which is featherweight in comparison and I don't regret it for one moment.
 

xenon

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Have another look at acolyte-preferably in a tackle shop which will let you run some line through the rings and flex it-if it's going to break due to flaws then it will then.
 

sam vimes

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I'm of the school of thought that likes to use the best possible tool for any particular scenario. Whilst I know that I'm far more extreme than most, I don't see any way that just two rods could feasibly cover everything without some compromises being made. I want different actions in waggler rods and trotting rods. I want different length rods for both flowing water and stillwaters of different depths.

There's not a great deal wrong with the Harrison GTi blanks, and many anglers still swear by them. However, from my angle, they are a bit long in the tooth compared to some alternate choices. This shows, primarily, in the weight of the rods. At 13', or less, you'll probably not really notice an ounce or two, especially in a well balanced rod. However, as the length of the rod increases, the differences become more apparent, especially in a trotting rod that will be in hand all day.

At the better part of £300 for a custom GTi, my own money would go elsewhere. However, I'd suggest that you talk to a few fans of the GTi. Even better, see if you can lay hands on one or two.
 

Jim Crosskey 2

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Yes to all Sam's points above.. I think trotting and Stillwater fishing have different requirements, and then there's the "light" and "heavy" sides of both disciplines...

(Judging from some of Sam's other posts on float rods, I suspect he'd have something like four or five categories between light and heavy, with a rod or two to cover each and every scenario!)

If you've got the budget to be considering a pair of GTIs then I suspect there's a lot of other choice available to you. However, the trouble with float rods is that it's incredibly subjective as to what constitutes a "good" one, and what floats someone's boat in terms of weight, action, recovery... well, someone else would hate it.

Also, just to confuse matters... manufacturers have a habit of trying to label everything to the nth degree.... so that "12 foot power carp waggler" rod might actually be just what you've been looking for to trot for barbel and chub on a small stream. But the honest label of "relatively powerful semi-through action float rod, max 8lb line" won't win them any marketing awards will it?

Good luck. Let us know what conclusions you come to.

For my part, I do also use two float rods for about 95% of my float fishing. For Stillwater work, which for me is generally relatively light line silvers/ tench/ perch but the occasional carpy intruder... I use a daiwa aqualite 13 foot waggler. Very light, easy to handle, makes catching anything fun. And then on running water (Sam will cringe at this.....:)) a Shakespeare Mach 3 waggler rod, which never sees a waggler but is set up with a centrepin and handles that very nicely. It's still a relatively modern through actioned rod but it is crisper on the strike than the daiwa, possibly 3 quarters of an ounce heavier but still pretty light (170-something grams I think?) and as you get in to the curve it has a little bit more oomph, which makes subduing 4lb-plus chub on a fast flowing river a doddle.
 

ben10

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I'lll have a think. I do like the look of the acolyte and did have a waggle of 1 in a tackle shop but it's the horror stories I've seen about them putting me off but as you say it'd likely break first time with line through if it was going to.

I agree 2 rods won't do it all and trotting rods are different to waggler rods but majority of my fishing is still water with some running water so to be an out and out stick rod is less important to me in that sense.

Thanks for the replies.
 

Graham Elliott 1

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I think everbody that has a 13 or 14ft Hardy is more than satisfied.

My 14ft has handled carp over 20lb yet has been perfect for trotting for silvers, specimen chub and perch.

Odd one comes up on e-bay. There are some 12ft ones now.
 
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tigger

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I'lll have a think. I do like the look of the acolyte and did have a waggle of 1 in a tackle shop but it's the horror stories I've seen about them putting me off but as you say it'd likely break first time with line through if it was going to.

I agree 2 rods won't do it all and trotting rods are different to waggler rods but majority of my fishing is still water with some running water so to be an out and out stick rod is less important to me in that sense.

Thanks for the replies.
A 13 or 14ft accy plus will cover most situations on still or running water....they do for me anyhow :).
 

flightliner

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I think everbody that has a 13 or 14ft Hardy is more than satisfied.

My 14ft has handled carp over 20lb yet has been perfect for trotting for silvers, specimen chub and perch.

Odd one comes up on e-bay. There are some 12ft ones now.
GRA' Did 'nt Hardy have a few problems with some of their game rods some time ago ?
 

Molehill

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I have a 13ft gti ( not the spliced tip) and 15ft s/u model, built them some years ago and plenty of use.
They have served me well, but there's probably better out there now - if you define better as lighter! I now have an acolyte for light float work and would chose that every time with light lines over the gti, but if I'm on a carp puddle fishing for anything and know I'll be pestered by carp then the gti will at least bring the blighters to the net a little quicker.

The s/u model is a bit of a brute, use it for barbel trotting and carp ( bigger baits), it does fine but a bit of a lump by today's standards, I'll stick with it as I don't need another rod, but I'm sure there's alternatives to look at.

Good rods, tough and take abuse, plenty of other options out there to look at. I wouldn't be without mine though.
 

ben10

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One last question, if I was to go the custom built gti route then do you think there will be much of a difference in the action of the rod between a ground and unground blank?

I prefer the look of a ground and clear coated blank, however, if the unground gti having a stiffer action improves the overall feel of the rod then I'd keep it unground.

Anyone have much experience with ground vs unground blanks?

Thanks
 

sam vimes

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It's largely a cosmetic thing and I think you'd be hard pushed to notice any difference. However, asking your rod builder of choice would be the safest option.
 

Molehill

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I remember asking Harrison's about this, they stated there was little difference ( that you would notice), I suspect only by having both models set up together would you be able to separate the two - if at all.

Cosmetically a ground blank is nicer and may be coloured and then this opens the way for whippings and trims to match. My thoughts anyway.

All my Harrison rods are ground and coloured, except a single fly rod and the 13ft gti float, both of which I wanted to knock up in a hurry.
 

Nomad1

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Another vote for the Acolyte. I’ve a 13ft Plus & it’s superb for virtually all my fishing needs. If I need a bit more grunt I’ve a custom Harrison Torrix 1.25lb built by Mark Tunley. Lovely rod but the Acolyte gets far more use. I tend to only fish still waters though.
 
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whitty

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I'm afraid I bought a 13ft Marksman and I couldn't get rid quick enough,it didn't have the action I was looking for,which I didn't realise until I had a few decent fish on it,as for being able to land big fish on it,I'd be upset if any rod wasn't able to land one,just some have better actions than others,I'm afraid Harrison float rods are too heavy to hold for any length of time,unless you go into the gym and do weights....
 

geoffmaynard

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I've now broken the mid-section of a14ft Hardy and the tip section of a Harrison 15ft. Two of my fav rods... so if anyone has a spare section...?
 
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