How did Carp get to the UK?

jackperks

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I'm fairly sure it was monks bringing them over for food but was just curious if people knew any more about it.
 

barbelboi

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Views concerning the introduction of carp to England had been based on comments in 'The treatyse of fysshynge with an angle' attributed to Juliana Berners, and published as part of The boke of St Alban's in 1496. Here the author says she knows little about the carp as 'there be but few in England'. As a consequence it was considered that the fish was largely a Tudor introduction. There is now some evidence to suggest that they had already begun to make their appearance in the late fourteenth century, at a time when changes were taking place in the fish-producing industry.
Jerry
PS this includes evidence to suggest major changes in the sea fishing industries
 
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jimlad

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Monks!

Honestly I don't know, but Donald Leney made a big impact in terms of introducing the king carp strain. Hand selecting fish produced some big fish waters, including redmire, frensham, savay and the electricity cut on the river nene


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barbelboi

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Indeed, the non-angling fish farmer working for the Surrey Trout Farm from the 1920's, Donald Leney almost single handedly introduced some of the most magnificent carp and carp waters (including some of my local Colne Valley pits) that have been seen in this country.
Jerry
 

Chevin

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Monks!

Honestly I don't know, but Donald Leney made a big impact in terms of introducing the king carp strain. Hand selecting fish produced some big fish waters, including redmire, frensham, savay and the electricity cut on the river nene


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Yeah, **** Walker, Fred Taylor and I got some of Leney's carp in the '60s and put them in a length of disused canal that was dammed at each end so that the water was retained. They grew at an incredible rate and after a few years were into double figures. We then electro-fished the canal with the help of Bernard Aldrich and his assistant Roger, and moved them to Snowberry Lake a few miles away. The carp continued to grow and the lake became a popular syndicate carp fishery which I ran for a few years. Eventually after we had done all of the work, the lease came up for renewal and a John Curry offered more money than we thought was practical. I did net the water in the hope of getting some of our carp back, but sadly we only got a couple of them. I have a picture of a twenty pounder from the canal somewhere, I will attach it here if I can find it.

I can't find the picture of the twenty pounder but here is a picture of some nice Leney carp from the canal before we moved them to Snowberry Lake.

 
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split shot

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The Romans were into carp farming, it's very likely that they were the first to introduce carp to the country.
 

barbelboi

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The Romans were into carp farming, it's very likely that they were the first to introduce carp to the country.
Very unlikely, all know evidence disputes that idea. The Romans were responsible for the introduction of carp into Italy and many other colonies from the Danube area. The United Kingdom was not included this initial expansion of the carps territory. Following the decline of the Roman Empire and the rise of the Monastic life of the early Christians the carp became a domesticated food fish of the monks. During this period the first selective breeding took place to try and improve the carp’s growth rate.

Records suggest that carp were present in England from the late fourteenth century, and that by the I53O's they seem well established and much sought after. Despite extensive searches historians have been unable to find reference to carp being kept in ponds in England before c1350. Research has shown that the most popular freshwater fish before this date were bream and pike, particularly on the royal table, where it is thought contemporary trends would be mirrored.
Jerry
 

tiinker

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My best advice would be to get your hands on a copy of the book:A History of Carp Fishing Revisited by Kevin Clifford . The information in this book is a revealation.
 

keora

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Actual date of the introduction of carp into the UK is not known. Various estimates range from the 14th to the 17th century. (From "British Freshwater Fishes, The Story of their Evolution" by Len Cacutt)
 

aebitim

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First reference I know of is 1412 in Hampshire, european monks escaping from the German warrior monks spreading their version of christianity through Poland and Lithuania. Aparantely there were three Popes at the time.
 

cg74

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....which was interconnected to our river systems before the landmass split and Britain became an island...;)
And Europe is connected by land to the Middle East, which in turn is (was) connected by land to Africa. Does that make crocodiles, hyenas and lions indigenous to Britain?
 
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