Length of line between end of pole and float

POLEMINATOR

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I've seen people with literally a couple of inches of line between end of pole and float, which to me makes sense in keeping a tight line

But I've also seen people with between half a metre and a metre can only guess this let's you have more movement with your pole without disturbing the float ? Or maybe allows your float to drift a bit further ?

Is there a correct or better length ?

Thanks in advance

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Mark Wintle

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You're obviously after lots of pole fishing info. Second hand copies of the pole fishing book I did are on ebay/Amazon for as little as a fiver posted (i get nothing from these sales as it is out of print) and will have all the info you need for not much more than the cost of a fishing magazine. Pole Fishing - A Complete Guide by Mark Wintle
 

markcw

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Mark ,thanks for info on book,I will look for it.
And to part answer the OP question it can depend on conditions and where you fish, you dont want a long length of line if next to snags ,the fish will be in them before you react,also a few inches of line is no good in inclement weather, bait presentation will be nil. A long length ideally backshotted would be better.
Mark's book would be an ideal read. The pole magazines seem to be more reviews than what they did , Not many diagrams with actual shot numbers, just "used number 9 shot with number 11 droppers" type write up.
 
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POLEMINATOR

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You're obviously after lots of pole fishing info. Second hand copies of the pole fishing book I did are on ebay/Amazon for as little as a fiver posted (i get nothing from these sales as it is out of print) and will have all the info you need for not much more than the cost of a fishing magazine. Pole Fishing - A Complete Guide by Mark Wintle
Thanks mark I will have a look

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POLEMINATOR

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Mark ,thanks for info on book,I will look for it.
And to part answer the OP question it can depend on conditions and where you fish, you dont want a long length of line if next to snags ,the fish will be in them before you react,also a few inches of line is no good in inclement weather, bait prevention will be nil. A long length ideally backshotted would be better.
Mark's book would be an ideal read. The pole magazines seem to be more reviews than what they did , Not many diagrams with actual shot numbers, just "used number 9 shot with number 11 droppers" type write up.
Yes that and hundreds of product advertisements I found in the few fishing mags I have picked up

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markcw

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Dont be afraid to ask questions on here,regardless of how daft you may think they are, You may get a number of different replies to same question but a lot of those replies will be on the basis of what works for that individual member . Such as what's the best line, shot, make and length of pole . But you will be able to find whats suits you and venues you fish.
 

POLEMINATOR

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Dont be afraid to ask questions on here,regardless of how daft you may think they are, You may get a number of different replies to same question but a lot of those replies will be on the basis of what works for that individual member . Such as what's the best line, shot, make and length of pole . But you will be able to find whats suits you and venues you fish.
Yes that's what I am here for other members experiences and opinions, no matter how different all will be valued equally, what works for one might not work for another etc,

There is no exact science to fishing and what works 1 day might not work another day, it's about absorbing as much information as possible and tailoring it to what works best and is comfortable to the individual.

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Jeff Woodhouse

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I don't know whether Mark Wintle covers this in his book; I'm fairly certain that **** Walker wrote about it. When pole fishing started on the Lee (or Lea) he said they referred to the amount of line between the tip of the pole and the float as the 'topping'. Usually, this was around a foot in length or thereabouts.
One idea was to sit at right-angles to the bank with the pole resting across both of the angler's level thighs with him sitting with his feet on the ground. The tip would then be off the water along with the topping which was tight to the float and no line on the water at all. Imagine it was his left side that faced the water so that when he had a bite, he needed only to lift his left heel off the ground in order to strike. That inch or so that his heel moved his thigh went upwards and was enough to move the 20ft Sowerbutts tip 15-18" and a strike was made.

I did try this once and it does work very effectively, but you do have to ensure that the topping is around a foot whatever depth you are fishing at.
 

POLEMINATOR

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I don't know whether Mark Wintle covers this in his book; I'm fairly certain that **** Walker wrote about it. When pole fishing started on the Lee (or Lea) he said they referred to the amount of line between the tip of the pole and the float as the 'topping'. Usually, this was around a foot in length or thereabouts.
One idea was to sit at right-angles to the bank with the pole resting across both of the angler's level thighs with him sitting with his feet on the ground. The tip would then be off the water along with the topping which was tight to the float and no line on the water at all. Imagine it was his left side that faced the water so that when he had a bite, he needed only to lift his left heel off the ground in order to strike. That inch or so that his heel moved his thigh went upwards and was enough to move the 20ft Sowerbutts tip 15-18" and a strike was made.

I did try this once and it does work very effectively, but you do have to ensure that the topping is around a foot whatever depth you are fishing at.
Thanks Jeff I will give this a try, i do tend to rest my pole under 1 arm and on top of 1 leg so i will try resting the pole on 2 legs at a right angle would be beneficial if i could free up my arm for loose feeding etc I'm less accurate with my other free hand

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POLEMINATOR

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You're obviously after lots of pole fishing info. Second hand copies of the pole fishing book I did are on ebay/Amazon for as little as a fiver posted (i get nothing from these sales as it is out of print) and will have all the info you need for not much more than the cost of a fishing magazine. Pole Fishing - A Complete Guide by Mark Wintle
Your book should be arriving today, I'm looking forward to reading it, will give you an update when I've read it.

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john step

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I do think that during clear water conditions fish do not appreciate a pole waving over their heads. That is why a longer line is sometimes used.
Depth and clarity variations I think.
 

peter crabtree

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There are many variations governed by conditions IMO .
Yesterday for instance I was fishing in 5' of fairly coloured water. The carp in that lake are big, averaging 8-18lb. There was no wind and due to the size of the carp I wanted my rig as short as possible as I knew a lot of elastic would be pulled out.I had just 4" above my float. If my rig had been long it would have been very tricky to land them on a topkit, even with puller bungs.
In windy conditions I like a couple of feet so if the pole is blowing about it doesn't disturb my float. Had that been the case yesterday I would have used a rod and line.
On a deep river using a top 4 rig I'd have at least 5' of line between poletip and float. As pointed out above, in clear water I'd also prefer a longer line as I believe fish can spook at a pole over their heads.
Broadly speaking there is no correct or optimum length between pole and float, conditions dictate the length for me.
 

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Petr have you tried backshotting pole float, also depending on conditions I have used a heavier float than normal, to stop it blowing about even soon short line.
I was in my tackle shop Saturday and the fella told me I should always put a little shot above my float, is this what you mean by back shotting ?

What's the idea behind a shot above the float ? If your line is shotted correctly and the float sinks correctly, the float should remain as stable as it can be ?

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markcw

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I was in my tackle shop Saturday and the fella told me I should always put a little shot above my float, is this what you mean by back shotting ?

What's the idea behind a shot above the float ? If your line is shotted correctly and the float sinks correctly, the float should remain as stable as it can be ?

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It does not necessarily have to be a small shot, it can be a few number 8 shot or a BB shot, the back shot are ther to help hold line steady in a wind, can also aid fish to bite ratio. If float is shotted correctly it should be stable, it's the long line above the float that moves .
 

nottskev

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The fashion for a really short line of a few inches, often backshotted, has been driven by commercial anglers, often fishing for F1's and trying to hold their pellet hookbait right on a small patch of potted feed.

There's logic in it for that specific purpose, but it's not a general necessity. It's much easier to avoid tangles shipping out or whatever if you leave a longer lash, and imo it suits better when you're after fish like roach that move around or up and down after feed that's being thrown or catapulted.

I like to fish a bit away from the pole tip, it's easier to dodge a bit of wind, you're less likely to accidentally move your float, you have more option to let your float move with the water if that works.... If you're fairly new to pole fishing, I think it would prove a handicap to set up with the commercial carp anglers' ultra-short lash. I've enjoyed pole fishing since they came out in the 70's, and I can't really remember being left behind by nearby anglers and thinking it was down to the couple of feet of line above my float.

Just adding one thing to backshot ideas: if you ever find yourself holding back a float on running water, it can be a problem that fish pull on the pole tip and drop the bait before you can react. A large shot above the float can put an angle in the line and let a proper bite develop.
 

markcw

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Kev you fish more running waters on the pole than myself.Have you tried the flat float (lollipop)float, ? If so do you back shot those, ?
I am asking because a stretch of canal here pulls through like a train when the locks open.A local tackle shop has had some mini flat floats made for it, I was thinking of giving them a go.
 

nottskev

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Kev you fish more running waters on the pole than myself.Have you tried the flat float (lollipop)float, ? If so do you back shot those, ?
I am asking because a stretch of canal here pulls through like a train when the locks open.A local tackle shop has had some mini flat floats made for it, I was thinking of giving them a go.
I'm not that familiar, Mark. The pole's good on the nearby Trent, but it tends to repay a running through rather than a holding-still style. There's a local canal, the Beeston, a 2.5 mile navigation loop around a weir, that always runs, and I've found that small flat floats like these (3/4 - 1g) work well, with an olivette and backshot as required.



That said, I can't remember when I last fished there. I found a canal that runs endlessly a bit wearing, holding your float up/back all the time, and the fishiest lengths are less than salubrious for the lone angler. Plenty do like it though, and it wouldn't be out of the way for winter league matches to be won with teens of pounds.

ps I know you didn't need a pic to know what a flat float is, but I have far too much time on my hands these days.
 
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