Lift method float fishing-loaded or unloaded

plattsie_fish

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have been looking at this lift method set up for my float fishing and am going to give it a go. I was just wondering, having a look at some pictures of rigs, they always seem to be with unloaded floats. i might give it a spin n with Olivette as an anchor but does it make it less sensitive using a loaded float??
 

mikench

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Ive used unloaded floats as recommended on here. I tried this for tench and succeeded.

 

plattsie_fish

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Ive used unloaded floats as recommended on here. I tried this for tench and succeeded.

that is what i want to hear. no greater recommendation than success. i am aiming at the tench in the lake i fish. luckily it is local to me so may pop out next weekend and put this into practice. thanks for the reply.
 

The Sogster

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Definitely unloaded. The buoyancy of the float helps to reduce the weight of the shot as the float lifts meaning less resistance is felt by the fish.
 

grayson

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Unloaded , definitely. I use 4 AAA floats , typically , and instead of lead on line I attach them link leger style, with the micro swivel stopped by a float stop . This helps me adjust the amount of line on the deck ,and if a fish weeds me the shot slide off easily.
 

Keith M

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If you are using the lift method it’s unloaded every time in my view, with my single (or double) shot right down on the bottom (and when possible I like using a shortish length of buoyant peacock quill).

NB: if you spread your shot out (like in the diagram on the right) you won’t get as clear an indication as when you just have one (or two) shot positioned nearer the hook (like in the diagram on the left).



Keith
 
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bullet

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Unloaded, I don't like too much weight on the bottom, not that I think it makes much difference, so have been using driftbeaters, which I can use only an AAA on the bottom and it will rise really nicely if anything picks up the bait.
 

Notts Michael.

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Unloaded, I don't like too much weight on the bottom, not that I think it makes much difference, so have been using driftbeaters, which I can use only an AAA on the bottom and it will rise really nicely if anything picks up the bait.
Haven't experimented much yet with lift method, but as the big, more easily visible tip of driftbeater type floats is (hopefully!) going to rise rather than go under, they are a good choice, I like the Drennan ones, nice and easy to see. the buoyant tip isn't a disadvantage if the fish isn't going to feel the resistance of pulling it under.
 

sam vimes

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Haven't experimented much yet with lift method, but as the big, more easily visible tip of driftbeater type floats is (hopefully!) going to rise rather than go under, they are a good choice, I like the Drennan ones, nice and easy to see. the buoyant tip isn't a disadvantage if the fish isn't going to feel the resistance of pulling it under.
I've done rather a lot of lift method fishing in the last two years. I reckon that the number of classic lift bites I get is somewhere south of 25%. Sadly, the water I'm fishing is rather deep, because I feel that a classic lift is more likely in shallower water. It also allows the use of lighter floats which may also help your chances of seeing the classic lift.
 

whitty

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Unloaded peacock for me,I find it works best locking the float with silicon stops so all the shot weight is on the deck,you get polaris type bites like this...
 

seth49

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I like unloaded floats for paste fishing, using no shot at all, as well as showing bites it shows if the paste has come of the hook, I’ve been making a few goose quill floats which should be ideal for this.
 

Deejay8

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I always use an unloaded float. All the weight wants to be on the shot on the bottom, so the indication on the float happens very obviously as soon as the fish takes the bait and the weight of the shot. I used to love fishing for tench using this method.
 

sam vimes

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When do you strike using the lift method, when it lays flat or wait when it goes under?
Depends on the float choice and exact set up. However, I tend to use big floats with big tips. I'd strike at any positive rise or dip of the float. If a float rose as much as the length of the tip when cocked properly, or the tip disappeared fully. Frankly, if a float managed to lay flat, I'd consider that I'd not been paying attention.
 

Keith M

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I pull the hook home as soon as the float starts to rise or just shoots off (which it often does).

Unlike Sam I prefer to use a short length of peacock quill of around 4 or 5 inches max which I find perfect for fishing fairly close in amongst the lilly beds.

I do use a fixed spool reel on occasion but I really prefer to use a Centrepin when it’s feasible; not only because of the thrill of the fight with a pin but also because I find it a little easier to wind the float down so that it cocks just right amount when I’m using a Centrepin.

Keith
 
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