Loading Lines on Reels, Part 2 - Fixed Spool Reels

Peter Jacobs

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Reel spool in the picture

Jeff,

Is it a function of the picture or does that reel spool look a little mis-shapen to you?

(The picture being the last one in the article.)

If it is damaged then the new line won't last long LOL
 
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Jeff

I used to load my reels as you describe with line coming off the spool the same way it goes onto the reel. However, Shimano instructions state that line should be loaded using 'the pencil through the middle' method due to the design of their rollers.

Any thoughts on this anyone?
 

geoffmaynard

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Jeff

I used to load my reels as you describe with line coming off the spool the same way it goes onto the reel. However, Shimano instructions state that line should be loaded using 'the pencil through the middle' method due to the design of their rollers.

Any thoughts on this anyone?
Do it the way Jeff says and you won't have any problems, but both ways can work.
The facts as I understand it is, with a fixed spool reel, there has to be some twist involved. Keeping it minimal is what is important. If the line on the spool has no twist in it, then it stands to reason that the act of casting will put a twist in it. (try Jeff's ribbon trick to prove it) Wind it back on to the spool and there's no twist.
If you don't load the line from the side of the spool and use a pencil, it will impart a twist in the line as it is wound onto the spool. This twist then is lost in the act of casting.
 

MarkTheSpark

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Very sound advice from Jeff. The pencil method ensures that, when the line is cast, it has no twist though when on the spool, it's quite heavily twisted. Jeff's method ensures it's stored without twists and the twists are imparted into the line during the cast (for the reasons he describes) I suspect that, over time, the line ends up in between, so that it's slightly twisted on the spool AND when cast (with twists in the opposite direction).
The ONLY function an anti-twist bail arm can perform is to prevent the reel forcing all the twist into the end of the line - i.e. allowing the twist to gradually make its way on to the spool. The mechanics of loading line through 90 degrees on to the spool always induces half a turn of twist every turn of the bail arm, no matter what device you have.
Just a last word: if you're having trouble on the bank with line twist, try this. Take all terminal tackle off the reel line but have it trailing from the rod tip. Now go for a long walk across any open space (preferably turf) allowing the line to peel off the spool on the way. After perhaps 100 metres, stop, put the bail arm over and begin reeling in fairly slowly, putting a SMALL amount of tension into the line with your fingers. As the line comes back to you, any pent-up twists will come out, and you can then fish without hassle.
 

Peter Jacobs

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Do it like Mark says, or alternatively; go and buy a Gardner Spin Doctor lead (they come in two or three sizes) and use it at the end of the day/session fishing.
 

klik2change

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Some time after loading fixed spools, not usually very long, I find the line underneath the line usually used, has a fine twist in it, as if someone has taken one end and twisted from the other end.

The same effect is noticeable a long way back on the line. It doesnt seem to matter what make of reel [I have okuma and shimano]. I always load it the way jeff says in the article, taping the spool to a heavy weight.

I have recently started to use a Daiwa line loader, which works like "the pencil through the spool" - but it still happens. I am not sure if this is a problem or not, as it always happens, though it does seem odd... Obviously it doesnt happen on centre pins. Twist is usually only an actual problem for me if I load the spool the wrong way round and it is always immediately obvious. :confused::)
 

Jeff Woodhouse

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Nature of the beast, spinning reels.

What line was it?

What can happen is the line beneath develops a set and coils off. Also, it is squashed unde the tension of the line above and this can seem like a twist, but in reality, it's just deformed.

Try taking a section of it tightly and running it quickly over your trouser to create heat. Hold it stretched until the line cools a little then let it hang. See if the coils and "twist" are still there.
 

klik2change

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What can happen is the line beneath develops a set and coils off. Also, it is squashed unde the tension of the line above and this can seem like a twist, but in reality, it's just deformed.
Hiya Woody,



The line is every kind of line I have used for the last ten years. There is a long list. What you have said here, though, is a reasonable explanation.

I just tried your suggestion with the line. It flattens out.

Thanks for your explanantion - I have been trying to understand what it is for years...

Perhaps the "twist" effect I was describing might be partially caused by the line trying to bed in on the coils below.

The line lay mechanisms prevent it bedding in directly like on a centre pin, but it sort of nearly beds in, slightly at an angle, so you get the deformation.

Does that sound right?
 

Jeff Woodhouse

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Yes, that's about it.

There will be some twist, of course, but it mightn't show like you said. It would more likely come off the reel in springs and loops if it were twist.

Being a little deformed doesn't do it any harm and on a very hot day you would notice it getting better again. No matter how reels lay the line there will always be crossovers where one line tightly wrapped over another tries to push it into a groove created by two below that and so on.

It's surprising how many people will change a line when there's no real need to.
 

klik2change

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It's surprising how many people will change a line when there's no real need to.
I know nylon will degrade in sunlight after a time, or so it is said, but I have line on some spools that I have had for more years than I know. Once you take a few metres off it then you're down to line that's been in the dark since it was last cast out.

I have known people who, quite literally, changed their line every month! [Carpers again...]
 
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