Polaris Floats

hague01

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I have had a love hate relationship with the above, but being particularly thick, untalented and generally moronic I never quite got the hang of using these floats successfully in both deep and shallow water. Returning to the bank after the lock down has however been a revelation.By treating the rod line, polaris and feeder etc as I would a quiver tip, has worked wonders. therefore, for what its worth here for anyone else interested in having a try. The key, for me is a fairly stiff'ish rod,not too heavy, 1 1/2 to 1.3/4, polaris float to cover the depth required, method feeder and 4" hook length.
Throw in as per normal, keep bail arm open until feeder hits the deck.Close bail arm, wind back until line submerged, then swiftly bring rod up, as per surface float fishing to sink the line, release bail arm, place rod on rests, float will surface very quickly. then just wind in to set. Keep line tight, as per a feeder so there is no play anywhere. The float will hold position even in heavy'ish waves. Bites are as positive as on a quiver. Used for up to late teens for carp.Works really well.( stress for me, no guarantees but its well worth a shot. I try to line another rod up so looking in one direction I can see both showing any bites. It has been great fun and very successful.
 

markg

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I had a mate who started using these all the time on commercials. They always looked a bit heavy and not very sensitive to me and he never caught more fish than me using lighter normal float fishing tactics. However, this looks like a good way to use them.
 

Keith M

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They never seemed to catch on back in those days, especially amongst the serious Match men.

I bought a couple but they ended up at the back of my shed soon after I bought them, probably because I had no use for them back then.

Keith
 

sam vimes

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I've been using them quite a lot for the last ten years, ever since I started to fish a deep gravel pit. They are ungainly to use, but, despite appearances, definitely aren't insensitive. Quite the opposite, the mechanics of the system make them far more sensitive than a standard waggler of similar proportions would be. One of the biggest issues I see with them is that many people use inappropriately small leads/feeders with them. going too light only makes their use more difficult. However, I'm at a bit of a loss as to why anyone would use them on shallow waters. I suppose that it might allow for a different presentation. However, in water much less than six feet deep, I can't see the point in using them.
 

hague01

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I agree about ungainly etc. My favourites look like howitzers,ie the deep water ones. I should have added,the makers advice to point rod tip at float is correct with a big qualification. A straight running fish won't show on the rod tip until it changes direction. But if fished in an arc,say 10 o'clock to 2 then it's the quiver tip effect. Two bite detections not just one. Set up this way too aids self hook setting too. It's the tip effect which to me makes a slightly heavier rod, if a stepped up/ power float/barbel.Even on shallow match lakes Sam, they are a fun alternative to a light float or bomb rod.. ps no I don't have any financial interest in Polaris, just a lot a grey hair due to the frustrations. You r also correct about the minimum weights. At least 50% more imho
 

hague01

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Just a final word on sensitivity. A bobbin, however light, will sink the float. That to me is all I need to know about how sensitive they are. Plus, sorry, if on the bottom, 50 yards away, at 75, the peepers ain't what they were so not only the tip quiver effect helps but if there's no one around a quiet alarm is useful too.
 

markcw

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There are also the Premier Locslide floats, I dont think these are as good as the Polaris ones.
I am thinking of getting a few more Polaris, the last ones I had seem to have disappeared over the years. They would be ideal on the gravel pit type waters down here.
 

hague01

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Never tried the locslide but was tempted by my continuing frustrations with the Polaris. They r in Coventry by the way. Yesterday I was fishing just 40 yards in 20' with an ics banjo 30g under the float. Try it like that and I promise you that you will cast it further than u can imagine. It's a great laugh at club waters when someone stops for a chat and asks where u t fishing. When u reply pointing out the float 70 yards away and say float fishing laying on there, they walk away muttering something about telling porkies and suggesting my parents weren't married.
 

rayner

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I think the Polaris float was invented by Terry Smith a Sheffield rod builder and top angler.
Not a float I ever tried but plenty did, a few anglers in a pub club had them, they used them on the local reservoirs.
 
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