Polaroids

Another Dave

Well-known member
I only restared fishing this year and one of my best purchases was a pair of sunnies from Boots that were polaroidised. But as the year draws on it's getting less sunny, so i'm starting to struggle a bit.

What's the answer here. My eyesight is ok-ish, but i do benefit from specs, especially as the light dims. Should i bite the bullet and pay for prescription specs that are both polaroid and recatolite (the thing where they get darker when it's sunny).

Or is there a budget way round this that a cheapskate like me needs to know about?
 

steve2

Well-known member
I would first suggest that you get your eyes tested than go from there. I use prescription polaroids not cheap but I use them for driving as well.
 

S-Kippy

Well-known member
My eyes are not what they once were either so I went to the opticians and got utterly mugged. I vowed not to fall for that again so I get by with cheap readers from Amazon. Sunglasses wise I have umpteen pairs in various lens colours. I find yellow best in all but the brightest sunlight and would be my 1st choice in low light conditions. Never used reactolites so I can't comment but it sounds like an expensive option to me. Opticians are all total footpads as far as I'm concerned.

Personally...pita though it might be I simply swap shades and readers around depending on what I'm doing. I only need the readers for close work like rebaiting or tying rigs. I can still see a float half a mile away....its hooks in me hand I struggle with.
 
Last edited:

s63

Well-known member
Had new lenses in my glasses last year and chose reactalite type, wish I hadn’t bothered, take ages to return clear coming indoors from sunshine, outdoors not the best filters either.

This Summer I splashed out on a pair of prescription Polaroids with brown lenses, great in both sunny and dull conditions, investigating the gin clear river has been a revelation.

Having frames reglazed can save you money, I use Cillary Blue, top class service.
 

wyncroft

Member
I may well be wrong but I don't think reactolite and polarised is an option. I think you're limited to either reactolite or polarised (or just a plain tint obviously).

I need glasses for driving and given most windscreens have a UV filter, reactolites apparently don't darken as much when you're behind the wheel, compared to outside directly in sunlight.

So for better vision on the river, and behind the wheel, I went with polarised prescription lenses
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
There were no trademarked Reactolight polarised lenses last time I looked, and Polaroid didn't do a light reactive. However, there is definitely one company that does a photochromic polarized. It's called Transitions Drivewear. For some bizarre reason, some glasses manufacturers use these lenses in their products and call them something different.
 

john step

Well-known member
Two points here I would like to add my twopence with........

Skippy,
I thought I was mugged by the optician. Then I was seduced by Specsavers ads two for one etc.
Despite having the anti glare coating I was dazzled at night driving and had to revert to the old glasses. The Specsavers were absolutely rubbish. The focus was wrong and despite my complaints they insisted they were correct.
I am now paying the going price at my old optician and its like having proper eyes back.
Don't forget opticians can pick up other health issues and refer you onwards.

Also the UV protection coating is important for anglers who not only get UV from downwards but also the reflection upwards from staring at a float.
Anything I can do to avoid cataracts must be good.

Another Dave,
I have varifocals and have a pair of Daiwa poloroid ( other makes available) clip ons.
They add weight granted but not enough to make me want to buy seperate specs.
They anti glare coating on my specs does to some extent compensate for when I dont have the poloroids clipped on.
 

mikench

Well-known member
I only need glasses for driving and distance work. I have two pairs of prescription sunglasses. One pair is a set of Raybans which are not polarised and the others which are polarised but darker!. Both have brown lenses. I use the polarised ones all the time even in murky light and find they are no problem at all.

I have some cords attached so they can hang from my neck when i need to change hooks rebait etc. The only downside to them is if you use your satnav a lot because the screen becomes blurred! It must be the polarisation aspect which does it.

I tried polarised sunglasses and add on lenses but not a patch on the prescription ones!
 

steve2

Well-known member
Something else I do find useful are over glasses these you wear over your existing glasses and they also have side protection. They come in various lens shades.
I think that the problem you have with night driving John is that car headlights are now too clear and bright a light for the human eye to adjust to. I find that I am virtually blinded by some and find like others they are a road hazard to safe driving, I think they should be banned.
 

S-Kippy

Well-known member
Two points here I would like to add my twopence with........

Skippy,
I thought I was mugged by the optician. Then I was seduced by Specsavers ads two for one etc.
Despite having the anti glare coating I was dazzled at night driving and had to revert to the old glasses. The Specsavers were absolutely rubbish. The focus was wrong and despite my complaints they insisted they were correct.
I am now paying the going price at my old optician and its like having proper eyes back.
Don't forget opticians can pick up other health issues and refer you onwards.

Also the UV protection coating is important for anglers who not only get UV from downwards but also the reflection upwards from staring at a float.
Anything I can do to avoid cataracts must be good.

Another Dave,
I have varifocals and have a pair of Daiwa poloroid ( other makes available) clip ons.
They add weight granted but not enough to make me want to buy seperate specs.
They anti glare coating on my specs does to some extent compensate for when I dont have the poloroids clipped on.
John

I bloody well was mugged by the optician. I walked in there with nigh on perfect eyesight ( only went for the test cos the firm insisted) an left there over 200 nicker poorer with TWO pairs of glasses. That constitutes total and utter footpaddery in my book. I've never been back as a result though I really should so that's hardly promoting good eyecare when the punters don't go for fear of being held hostage or robbed.

Mrs S just got a reasonable deal at Boots. I might try them but I won't go within half a mile of the gits who had me over no matter how many reminders they send me. Thieving magpies !

Skippy
 

john step

Well-known member
John

I bloody well was mugged by the optician. I walked in there with nigh on perfect eyesight ( only went for the test cos the firm insisted) an left there over 200 nicker poorer with TWO pairs of glasses. That constitutes total and utter footpaddery in my book. I've never been back as a result though I really should so that's hardly promoting good eyecare when the punters don't go for fear of being held hostage or robbed.

Mrs S just got a reasonable deal at Boots. I might try them but I won't go within half a mile of the gits who had me over no matter how many reminders they send me. Thieving magpies !

Skippy
Oh dear:eek: Just goes to show how we all differ. I bet you would definitely say I was mugged:eek:mg: as my last pair was about £480:eek:
I am due a new pair next year.
£200 for two pairs seems OK. but having been weighed off with sub standard cheap stuff as previously mentioned by Specsavers I will just have to cough up and get another top notch pair.........or give up float fishing.....never.
 

S-Kippy

Well-known member
Oh dear:eek: Just goes to show how we all differ. I bet you would definitely say I was mugged:eek:mg: as my last pair was about £480:eek:
I am due a new pair next year.
£200 for two pairs seems OK. but having been weighed off with sub standard cheap stuff as previously mentioned by Specsavers I will just have to cough up and get another top notch pair.........or give up float fishing.....never.
It was a long time ago, John. From what I've heard 200 sovs nowadays would be considered something of a bargain. I will die naked in a ditch before I pay 500 nicker for a pair of bins.
 

steve2

Well-known member
Neighbours son is an eye specialist and surgeon he told that unless you have eye problems always buy your reading glasses of the peg. All that reading glasses are is magnifiers.
My last bill for glasses came to over £400 because I have to have special lenses. Are the opticians ripping me off as far as I can see no. But then some people would rather pay out £100’s of pounds for a new rod than get a good pair of glasses. I would rather spend it on my eyesight
 

Peter Jacobs

Moderator
Staff member
For the first time in over 30 years I am able to but proper polarised non-prescription) sunglasses.

Until the cataract surgery earlier this year I had to wear prescription sunglasses and never really found any as good as the non-prescription alternatives.

I ended up with a German make and have been very happy with them . . . . .
 
Top