Preparing Bread

  • Thread starter Ron Troversial Clay
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Ron Troversial Clay

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I don't know why, but I've been asked on a few occasions recently how to prepare bread for the hook.

First the loaf itself. I never use sliced bread for any kind of fishing. I have also hardly ever used a bread punch in my life. I did once buy some of those oval bread punches that Drennan did, but found them as good as usless.

I use a farmhouse loaf for both flake and crust. For flake, take a piece of a fresh farmhouse loaf and pinch it on the shank of the hook leaving a nice length of un-compressed bread beyond the bend. I much prefer an eyed hook for this. For crust, tear a piece off the loaf, put the point in crumb side first, push it through and then bring the hook point out at the crust side.

When legering this bait you will need to put an adequately sized shot about 1 inch from the hook. The crust pops up in the water.

And now something that anglers don't seem to use these days - bread paste.

It's absolutely deadly for big roach. You need a farmhouse loaf that is about 5 days old. Cut off all the crusts and slice up the bread into 1 inch thick slices. Run each slice under the tap and soak the bread with chlorine free carbon filtered water.

No I don't like the idea of the water tasting of chlorine.

Squeeze out the slice and start kneading. Add another slice and keep going. Soon you will have a lovely smooth white paste which you can keep between some clean cloth, ready for fishing.

Bread is a very cheap fantastic bait. Most of my roach over 2 lbs have come to bread in one form or another.

I guess the only reason you don't see much of it in the mags these days is that it will mean zero name plugging, except perhaps for Warburtons etc.
 
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Peter (Tackle Tart) Jacobs

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The only point I might disagree with Ron is that about bread punches, but then I used them a lot in my match fishing days and still do on ocassion.

There are some pretty good bread punches available and just about everyone make them. The only tip I would offer is to get a set made of a material that floats. I've lost count of the number of punches I've lost over the years. Another annoyance is that I've only ever seen them sold in sets of 3 or 4. I wish you could just buy individual punches to replace those that simply, sank!

At this time of the year I do tend to use a lot of bread baits for both Roach and Chub on the rivers, and on its day it cannot be beaten.
 

GrahamM

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The Drennan pear-shaped punches are excellent for chub on those days when they're not biting properly.
 

Baz

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I have used spent bullet cases for punches in a number of sizes, also pen tops.
As for flake, I use sliced bread, as I like to use a sliver of flake rather than a chunk, if you see what I mean, but there's no harm in trying both.
 
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Nigel Connor(ACA ,SAA)

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Graham. I'd agree about the Drennan flake punches.Very good bits of kit when using flake as you dont get that tough bit of dough where you pinch the paste to the hook shank which I think can effect presentation if the fish are shy.

One method of bread preparation not mentioned is wet bread. This was traditionally used by Thames anglers.You take the crusts form a stale uncut loaf leaving a little flake underneath.Soak the srusts in water which can be flavoured if you wish & then wrap them individually in newspaper about 4/5 sheets thick.Put the paper parcels under several heavy books overnight or slightly longer. What you end up with is a slightly damp compressed soft crust which is durable enough to survive fast currents or long trotting.
 
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Ron Troversial Clay

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Spent bullet cases!

I have lots of .38 special and 9mm spent cartridge cases around.

I think I should have stated that not being a match angler I have had little use for bread punches. The smallest hook I have ever used for bread of any kind is an eyed 14.
 
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Peter (Tackle Tart) Jacobs

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Nigel & Graham,

Do you mean the green oval shaped punches?

If so, those are very good and they float :)
 

GrahamM

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Yep, they're the ones Peter, you get a selection of about 4 sizes in the pack.
 
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Ron Troversial Clay

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Graham, I purchased a set of those Drennan punches years ago. I just could not get on with them. The bread wouldn't stay on the hook and somehow to my stupid brain the baits they produced looked artificial.

I went back to pinching tiny bits of flake with my hands.
 
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Ron Troversial Clay

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Another good bait I mentioned on a previous thread is flour dough. The Victorians used it but somehow it has been forgotten along the way.

Mix water or beaten egg with flour until you have a stiffish consistancy that holds on a hook very well. If putting it one is messy, it is not stiff enough.

I have caught lots of roach, carp and other species you will not see in England with this bait.
 
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john conway

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Unlike Ron I do use slice loafs, Fresh Warburtons 800g Toastie only for the hook but any cheap ASDA type loaf for liquidised bread for the feeder. I?ll generally have 4 or 5 loafs in the freezer at any point in time for my chub fishing.
A typical five-hour session for one rod would be one cheap 800g sliced loaf liquidies for the feeder and four slices of the Warbutons for the hook. Any crust leftovers from making the flake are torn up into tiny pieces and added to the bag of liquidiesed bread thoughout the session. The flake is about the size of a 50p folded onto a size 8 or 6 hook and nipped about the top of the hook shank around the eye.
I also use a small 1cm length of crust off the edge of the Toastie Loaf placed on the hook as described by Ron then I wrap a small piece of cheese paste around the top of the hook shank.
 

Mark Wintle

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Buy bread punches? Why? I make my own out of hard balsa and brass tube bought from model shops. Then the punches float, I paint them bright red so I can see them in the reeds when I drop them. Also I make the depth of the punch such that it does NOT compress the bread. The brass is sharpened too to cut the bread. Smallest punch is for a 20 (rarely used) up to a couple of ones for a size ten, one of these is irregular for a pear shaped type piece. Mostly I use the sizes around 16 & 14. These are far better that the Drennan ones that are too flexible and compress the bread too much.
In my experience, there are days (most of them) when the roach prefer punch to little bits of flake, but other days when the little bit of flake is better. Even changing punch size matters so I've got them in 1mm steps, so experiment.
Because I buy the brass tube in 1 foot lengths (about ?1.80 a piece), I make the punches in sets and flog 'em cheaply so I get my own punches free!
I've tried wet bread. It takes some preparation but definitely works.
 
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Mel Crighton

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Can someone answer this for me is wholemeal any good liquidised for the feeder, not the soft soggy stuff the whole grain type, I have tried white liquidised mixed with Coconut and crushed nuts, or as a paste using smooth peanut butter as the binder, had a few small pasties on it .
 

Baz

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(what do the carp see?what do we wear? )

Mel,
Ron covered youre question on the above thread.
 
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Wag

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Try adding a little custard powder to your bread paste, it can be deadly for chub and roach.
I've never needed to use small hooks for bread fishing, like Ron I find a size 14 as small as I need to go, but then again I don't match fish.
I do use a small bread punch to pop a circle of bread on to a size 16 hook before tipping it with a red maggot or redworm, I find it often sorts the better fish from a shoal.
 

Peter Jacobs

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I was fortunate enough to see Mark's homemade bread punches last Sunday and they really do look excellent.

Painted up in fluroescent orange and with a long(ish) balsa handle they should last for ever.
 

Anthony Dixon 2

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A method I've had a bit of a success with of late is about 80% wholemeal bread (cheap Morrison's sliced including crust) mixed with 15% bran flake and 5% powdered milk.
Stick it in a liquidiser...
A minimal amount of water makes a superb paste and with no water you should be able to form nice balls of groundbait or loose for the feeder.
Just made a mix for tomorrow with a couple of pinches of ground Basil in...never tried it before but it smells good!
I also believe that the old favourite Marmite works wonders in a paste.

Anthony
 
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The Monk

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bread is no longer the same stuff it used to be when I was a kid in the fifties, it has all these preservsatives in these days and can no longer be squeezed as easily on the hook. Even the farmhouse stuff appears different, is it something added to the basic grain or what?
 

Anthony Dixon 2

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I reckon it must be something to do with the pesticides and preservatives.
A bloke I know, used to work in a bread mill and once told me that in the old days the flour used to be 'visably moving' with all the "wildlife" it contained.
I'd put it down to these times of EU standards and paranoia over food hygiene.
 
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