River Ribble Barbel Tips !!

Just Paul 1

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Can anyone advise on where on a river is it best to possibly catch a barbel. Do they prefer fast water or slower deeper pools. Also, does luncheon meat still do the trick. Never fished for barbel before so any tips would be great, many many thanks.
 

Keith M

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The first thing I look for when I’m after Barbel is a place with either a nice gravel bed or Rocky bed, or even an area with nice clean sand on its bed; which preferably has some flow in it, and cabbages and streamer weed makes it even more likely for it to hold Barbel.

As an example the river Lea goes through areas of thick silt where almost no Barbel are caught at all but it also has stretches of river with hard gravelly bottoms and lots of streamer weed and it’s these stretches which are often populated with quite a lot of Barbel. I won’t name any of these places for obvious reasons.
I do however know of a silty backwater where some nice Barbel can often be found although the Barbel can swim into this silty backwater from a clean gravel bottomed stream which makes it ideal.

Features to look out for are the outsides of bends in the river which have often been scoured out during floods, or just downstream of them; Places with deep undercut banks and bank cutouts next to tree roots etc., places that are lined with a lot of rush beds which also have a steady flow running past them over gravel, large beds of streamer weed and cabbages and with lots of different depths. I often find Barbel above cattle drinks just before the water starts to shallow up slightly.

If you can find an older type of Weir then fishing right under the white water along its sill will often find some Barbel who are lying in the slightly calmer water below the white water above, often in undercuts that have been bored out over the years by the scouring of the water coming over the weir sill.
The tail end of some of these Weirs often produce a few Barbel too.

Of course the list goes on and on, but I hope this has been of some use to you Paul.

Keith
 
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Just Paul 1

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The first thing I look for when I’m after Barbel is a place with either a nice gravel bed or Rocky bed, or even an area with nice clean sand on its bed; which preferably has some flow in it, and cabbages and streamer weed makes it even more likely for it to hold Barbel.

As an example the river Lea goes through areas of thick silt where almost no Barbel are caught at all but it also has stretches of river with hard gravelly bottoms and lots of streamer weed and it’s these stretches which are often populated with quite a lot of Barbel. I won’t name any of these places for obvious reasons.
I do however know of a silty backwater where some nice Barbel can often be found although the Barbel can swim into this silty backwater from a clean gravel bottomed stream which makes it ideal.

Features to look out for are the outsides of bends in the river which have often been scoured out during floods, or just downstream of them; Places with deep undercut banks and bank cutouts next to tree roots etc., places that are lined with a lot of rush beds which also have a steady flow running past them over gravel, large beds of streamer weed and cabbages and with lots of different depths. I often find Barbel above cattle drinks just before the water starts to shallow up slightly.

If you can find an older type of Weir then fishing right under the white water along its sill will often find some Barbel who are lying in the slightly calmer water below the white water above, often in undercuts that have been bored out over the years by the scouring of the water coming over the weir sill.
The tail end of some of these Weirs often produce a few Barbel too.

Of course the list goes on and on, but I hope this has been of some use to you Paul.

Keith
Hi Keith. . Many many thanks for you great tips. I'm going to try what you suggested providing I can find an ideal peg. Fingers crossed and I will let you know how I get on this weekend. . . Thankyou.
 

markcw

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The first thing I look for when I’m after Barbel is a place with either a nice gravel bed or Rocky bed, or even an area with nice clean sand on its bed; which preferably has some flow in it, and cabbages and streamer weed makes it even more likely for it to hold Barbel.

As an example the river Lea goes through areas of thick silt where almost no Barbel are caught at all but it also has stretches of river with hard gravelly bottoms and lots of streamer weed and it’s these stretches which are often populated with quite a lot of Barbel. I won’t name any of these places for obvious reasons.
I do however know of a silty backwater where some nice Barbel can often be found although the Barbel can swim into this silty backwater from a clean gravel bottomed stream which makes it ideal.

Features to look out for are the outsides of bends in the river which have often been scoured out during floods, or just downstream of them; Places with deep undercut banks and bank cutouts next to tree roots etc., places that are lined with a lot of rush beds which also have a steady flow running past them over gravel, large beds of streamer weed and cabbages and with lots of different depths. I often find Barbel above cattle drinks just before the water starts to shallow up slightly.

If you can find an older type of Weir then fishing right under the white water along its sill will often find some Barbel who are lying in the slightly calmer water below the white water above, often in undercuts that have been bored out over the years by the scouring of the water coming over the weir sill.
The tail end of some of these Weirs often produce a few Barbel too.

Of course the list goes on and on, but I hope this has been of some use to you Paul.

Keith
Keith, when you mentioned the weir, it was as if you were describing the one on the River Bollin at Warburton in Lymm.
This is a narrow river, a nice glide from the weir the a bend that goes under the road,
I have had barbel by casting into the weir itself and also where the water starts to slow down some yards from the weir, their used to be a willow tree on the far bank which was an easy cast if you sat on the gravel opposite. The barbel went to around 7lbs.
Unfortunately there are no longer any barbel in that stretch of the Bollin, the seem to have disappeared along the complete stretch to the Ship Canal. The willow tree is no more, this was removed when apartments were built when the animal feed mill was demolished.
 
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