Side casting reels

markg

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I had one of these many years ago for sea fishing, I used it off the pier and the boat. It was a bit clumsy but I liked it for some reason.
I found a Alvey 40 bakelite side casing reel for £10 last week. I thought it has to worth a tenner. These are made in Australia where I gather they are a lot more popular than here.
I gave it a clean, some oil, some backing line and 5lb line and tried it out. I think I made a mistake and this was meant for sea fishing but I gave it a go. It is a bit heavy but as I don't hold a rod much I was not too bothered by that. I liked the sloping spool which cast beautifully, more sloping than you get on a fixed spool. I could easily cast to the other side of the river with a float and 3bb. The twist mechanism is operated by a level but is a bit awkward however, I think I could get used to this. Once back into center pin mode it runs quite smoothly now it is oiled, not too proper modern center pin standard but smooth and spins quite a few times with the finger. The center nut is a drag and can tighten to required level. I kept it just tight to stop over-spills but winds in very easily. It has a big center cage thing and I have not quite worked out the point of that yet but it did make pulling loops from a bit easier or so it seemed in my mind when I could not be bothered to operate the twist for shorter casts.
I think I could design one of these for coarse fishing with modern materials and lightness. The best of both worlds, good casting ability and the good at playing a fish center pin style and the benefits of that.
It got me wondering why these have never caught on, I will try it out for a while; I think I prefer it than my fixed spool even with the drawbacks because of its age and old materials, but time will tell with more try outs
 

seth49

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I have the Shakespeare Lincoln version of this reel, also made by Alvey, I used it for totting a shrimp for salmon on the ribble, it did this well, as I could trot a float down the river, and I could cast a reasonable distance with it too, also used it for free lining a couple of worms for salmon and sea trout as well, it did these things very well.

Also trotted for grayling and chub in winter with this reel and it handled that ok too.

It only had a friction drag though, if it had a decent ratchet on it would still use it now for margin fishing for carp etc, I liked using this reel, it’s retired now to the cabinet.
 

S-Kippy

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Youngs made the Ray Walton Rolling Pin....a sidecasting centrepin. Bit of a marmite reel....some loved them,others didn't. I suspect those that loved them had shelled out a lot of money for one as they weren't cheap.

I tried one in a shop once. Didn't like it at all....felt weird and I thought learning to use a real centrepin properly was the better ( and very much cheaper) option.
 

markg

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I think they would take a bit of getting used to but is that just because we have got so used to what is a bad design in reality! I have never really liked fixed spool reels just accepted they were the "thing" but I think they are designed for the angler's convenience more than angling if you see what I mean. They cast well but look wrong-big handle sticking out and not exactly a streamlined thing to have on a rod with not good balance easily achieved, twist line, wind in awkwardly especially if a big fish is on and don't play fish well, I have never found the drag mechanisms used much good either and usually back wind which is not ideal. Not a lot going for them except the distance cast but thats it, have we all just been dulled into accepting what is actually a badly designed product. I have not got on very well with center pins either so this might suit anglers like me, a bit of the best of both worlds but still a compromise. However, I do not see why a very good one could not be designed with good trotting ability, good distance casting, good playing of fish combined with distance casting. The mechanism for turning the reel could be improved though, maybe with some automation included.
 
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Keith M

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My father had an Alvey side cast reel that he used for pier fishing. I think it was back in the 1960’s, the main problem was the line twist it created by the line coming off sideways during the cast but being wound back onto the spool in the normal manner. I think it was this problem which caused it not to take off very well, but in some situations it wasn’t that bad.

Keith
 
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mikench

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Cue for Gordon perhaps. Is the oversized ring part of the reel?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

markg

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Cue for Gordon perhaps. Is the oversized ring part of the reel?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yep, it is this that makes me think it is meant for sea fishing and the fact the spool has quite a large capacity.
 

Keith M

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Mark, I don’t think it has many advantages over a Centrepin; with or without a line guard.

In my view:
1. It isn’t as freerunning as a good Centrepin; which can be set in motion using just a couple off BB weights.
2. its renowned for generating line twist when you cast and retrieve too often in its two different planes.
3. It is big and clunky compared to a good Centrepin.

It’s only plus point in my view is it’s ability to cast a little easier sometimes; although casting over 30 yards or so with a centrepin isn’t that difficult once you have learnt how to use the Wallis cast, and casting with a good fixed spool reel is even easier.

For sea fishing yes it could be fun using a sidecast reel but I can’t see it being anything but a hindrance when trying to present a bait on the average freshwater tackle. Although at a pinch I suppose it could be fun fishing a surface bait after Carp with it; but not necessarily easier in my view.

Keith
 
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markcw

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Mark, I don’t think it has many advantages over a Centrepin; with or without a line guard.

In my view:
1. It isn’t as freerunning as a good Centrepin; which can be set in motion using just a couple off BB weights.
2. it produces line twist when you cast and retrieve in its two different planes.
3. It is big and clunky compared to a good Centrepin.

It’s only plus point in my view is it’s ability to cast a little easier; although casting over 30 yards or so with a centrepin isn’t that difficult once you have learnt how to use the Wallis cast, and casting with a good fixed spool reel is even easier.

For sea fishing yes it could be fun using a sidecast reel but I can’t see it being anything but a hindrance when trying to present a bait on the average freshwater tackle. Although at a pinch I suppose it could be fun fishing a surface bait after Carp with it; but not necessarily easier in my view.

Keith
Keith ,post positive views please, Mark is convincing @mikench to buy it, and as @markg future agent I am waiting my cut of the sale money.
Kind regards Markcw 🤷‍♂️
 

Keith M

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Keith ,post positive views please, Mark is convincing @mikench to buy it, and as @markg future agent I am waiting my cut of the sale money.
Kind regards Markcw 🤷‍♂️
It is perfect for fishing for big Catfish close in on heavy lines and braids.
It is perfect for deadbaiting and for fishing a Pike bung Float after Pike.
It is perfect for fishing large floating surface baits in the margins after large Carp.
It is perfect for getting strange looks from other anglers when your trying to cast delicate wagglers or stick floats with it.
It looks very nice on a shelf in your fishing den and a good talking point too.
Plus it’s great for sea fishing off harbour walls and jetties or off boats in shallowish coastal waters.

Is this positive enough Mark?

Keith
 
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markg

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Some interesting points, I did not think of the line twist angle. Regarding trotting, not this reel but I think one could be engineered to the degree of a high end center pin. In general it would not suit all tastes but I I have never been happy with any fixed spool reel as I have said in a previous post, there is a lot wrong with them that we overlook because we have just got used to them and accept the fact that they are not very good at most jobs.. I find getting any distance with a center pin just a bit too irksome, I can loop the line but after 4 loops I tend to get a tangle now and then and even if not I find it irksome having to do that every time I cast, and distance is still limited. I mainly fish close in but sometimes I want the distance. I just tried this reel as I had just bought it and wanted to see how it worked in practice out of curiosity as much as anything however, I did not get much of a chance last time, weather, rain, etc and did not really fish properly but I was not unhappy with what I did do. casting and reeling in was no problem, nearly great in fact although a bit more getting used to is required and if I had hooked a big fish; I felt it would have handled it very well, better than a fixed spool anyway. I will give it a few more goes and see how it goes but I wont like the line twist if that becomes a problem. Anon..
 
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S-Kippy

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Never mind the Alvey....try a Mallochs !

Seriously....line twist is an issue ( it has to be when you think about it) and there is a weight penalty too. Until I tried one I sort of fancied a RW Pin but that suffered from line twist too I believe.
 

rubio

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If you stumble across one of the old rosewood Alvey's you just might get the money you're asking.
 

whitty

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I have a custom built pin which makes the RW rolling pin look rubbish,it is very well manufactured and the turning mechanism well thought out,line twist is a problem,so leaving the rod made up is a no-no,needing stripping and rewinding fairly regularly,but as a fish playing tool it is a joy,when I fish on holiday at Christchurch however I find the massive weed problems do not allow 1/1 retrieves,so I do take it any more,good for my more recent barbel fishing nearer to home..
 

markg

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If you stumble across one of the old rosewood Alvey's you just might get the money you're asking.
The £100 was just me being ironic, a joke, I was surprised that some did not see that! I am not expecting to get that, never was, there are examples of the Alvey40 between £35 and £70 on eBay etc, mine cost £10. I knocked the bloke down from £15 because he knows me and I sometimes buy odd bits of old fishing gear off him. I often have no idea what these things are worth when I buy, I just estimate that they must be worth at least what I pay for them and £10 looked good. As it turned out it was, I often end up with them in a cupboard where they gather dust or I put them in with a job lot and put them in an auction, I don't like eBay anymore, too much palaver.
I will carry on trying this out and depending I may keep it or put in an auction with some other bits I want to go. I might try it out for sea fishing first as well which it might be more suitable. It could be good for dropping down off a jetty or pier for example. The line twist might decide whether I keep it, see how that goes. Whatever it's fate it has opened me up to the possibilities of using side cast reels, I like them and can see a lot of advantages.
If I see a rosewood one for £15 I will snap it up, thanks for the info, its all part of the learning curve which cannot be a bad thing.
 
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seth49

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When I put line on Lincoln reel, I used 20 lb power pro braid, might sound heavy but it’s as thin as 4 lb mono, I did have problems with line twist at first, but after using it for a while it became more supple, and then it worked well, didn’t seem to twist up any more, and it floated well too, and it lasts for years.
 
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