Simple question - barbel reels

GrahamM

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We've had a vote on the Mailing List lately on 'which is the best reel for barbel fishing? What's your favourite?
 
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BUDGIE BURGESS

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I like the ABU C5 nice size and a good drag.But I am old fashioned!
 

PETER MELLOR

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I favour the Shimano 5010GT Baitrunner,excellent for those rod-wrenching bites and it will save your rod taking a unexpected bath.
 
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Paul Hiom

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Whilst i agree that for all round general barbel fishing, the 5010 standard or GT is hard to beat, it is a bulky reel and can be heavy if held for long periods. I would certainly use one when static legering or when using a feeder, however, a reliable 3000 or 4000 sized reel which is much lighter would suit my style of main style barbel fishing (touch legering)much better. I currently use Shimano FGT 3000s which are spooled with 8 & 10lb mono. They are great little reels although now sadly not available. The newer front drag shimanos are worth looking at and i do have a preference for front drag which is more instant when fishing off the clutch.
 
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D Taylor

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Nice plug Ray - on the other hand has anyone tried the very competitively priced Cardinal 53/54 ideal for the average Kennet Barbel. V.smooth clutch for a mere ?30.
 
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Steve King

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The Abu Suveran is the best reel for barbel that I have used. The clutch is really smooth and easy to adjust. Pity about the price though!

Baitrunners have their uses, but I know a lot of snaggy swims where I wouldn't dare use one. If you want to stop your rod going in keep hold of it!
 
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John Tait

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Being a poor, impoverished ex-carp angler, I use the 8010 GT Aero's I used to use for carp


Jonty
 
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Goose Ganderton

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I too use shimano x010 reels (all the x010 seem to me to be the same size just smaller line capacity spools) but I have just brought a pair of shimano stradic 4000gtm what a fantastic little reel they are. I have already used them for chubbing and swimfeedering for bream and they are great. next time out after barbel i will defenetly be giveing them a go. ill keep you posted with how they managed.
 
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ALAN ROUNDER

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After buying a Young's R. W Rolling pin I am no longer rich.
Have owners/users had any of the following problems and, indeed, any solutions?
1. Trouble keeping up with running fish and retrieving quickly enough over snags due to the small diameter of the reel and its inherent slow retrieve.
2. Bashed knuckles when letting a fish run due to the handles being too close to the rim.
3. One of the handles coming completely away from the drum on the retrieve. (I wind line on my pins in the opposite direction to most)
4. Insufficient ratchet spring tension such that a bit of weed on the line causes the reel to give line.
5. Worst of all the entire reel turning on its side cast facility during the playing of a fish. Very disconcerting this when trying not to yield line near to snags.
Another reel poser. Most of my pins have either ball bearings or a pin (true centrepins). Could someone explain to me why Young's reels have both systems? Which is the drum running on and what is the advantage of such an arrangement?
 
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Niel Dunnage

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Being a bit of an old fart, I would say the old Mitchell 300 and in particular 300 Pro takes some beating, I've yet to loose a barbel on my two because of the reel. Great line lay, drag that has never failed me, and spare bits that are easy to get hold of such as when a mate borrows them and undoes and then promptly drops the handle in fast flowing deep water
 
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Alan Cooper

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I have always thought (naive?) that all ball bearing reels had a central "pin" over which the bearings run. I haven't seen Ray's reel yet but I find I just can't get on with centrepins without a line guard arrangement - the best of which (in my opinion) is the "caged" Youngs variety. By the way, if anyone wants to buy (cheap!) a Shakepeare Lincoln sidecast let me know. It is very free running - less than 2 no 4 shot get it spinning. No guard though - I prefer my Youngs caged "lightweight."
 
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Ray Walton

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Hi.. Alan Rounder....Please read the instruction guide which came with the reel! You should use your'thumb" on the rim as the brake, and for more, extra control, the palm of your hand on the bottom of the spinning spool.You should'nt play the fish via the handles, only to retrieve line when the fish is beaten or when running towards you! The 'turning' of the reel is because your playing the fish via the handles, which is not the way to use 'a' or this centrepin. The true purpose of the reel is for 'rolling' baits, where the rod is held in the hand, and not used via a rod rest, hence the weed taking line. However,the tension can modified by a 'stronger' spring from J.W.Youngs. I originally tried using it your way with the line coming off from the top and i found it very awkward and impracticle for the method. Any more problems then let me know...Rollin Ray, have a nice day. P.S....A mark 2 version with new features is in the pipeline via myself and J.W.Young!
 
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Ray Walton

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One more thing, alan...If you are using the Rolling Pin for 'static' fishing, (which i do at times), i always fully tighten up the Drag/Brake system via the knurled knob (indicated (K) on the instruction leaflet), which will help 'tighten the ratchet/spring tension.
 
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ALAN ROUNDER

Guest
Ray, thanks for the advice on using centrepins, I must have been doing it wrong for nigh on thirty years. Your advice to fully tighten the reel's drag system for static fishing would then make off the drum style 'Wallis' casting impossible. Presumably I'd need to slacken off the drag again to allow the reel to turn freely enough to make a cast. This slackening and re-tightening of the drag takes TWENTY SECONDS Ray, surely you don't expect anglers to do that EVERY time they cast, maybe at night or in the rain especially on a reel costing over ?350. If that's what you've been doing its little wonder you took to rolling meat.
I think what I was trying to get over was that I was disappointed with the reel especially considering its price. I certainly didn't expect one of the handles to come off in my hand and I still think the side cast facility spring is far too weak. I can feel the reel 'rocking' on the spring on the retrieve. For my part I'd prefer the reel to either lock in the fishing position or retain the existing sytem but incorporate a much stronger spring. A larger diameter drum (to allow faster retrieve) would be nice as would a narrower drum. For static fishing instead of changing ratchet springs over how about making the ratchet spring tension ADJUSTABLE and lets put the the ratchet knob on the front where it can be operated by the fingers holding the rod not at the back where it is now.
Anyway Ray, thanks for taking the trouble of replying to me and keep on rolling.
 
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paul williams

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Rollin Ray, That really deserves an answer, you asked the original question, so now can you justify why we should spend on these reels?
 
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Keith Finn

Guest
This just says it all to me.
Everyone has their own personal choice in fishing tackle, one mans ideal reel for a particular session , another person would not use.
My friend prefers Diawa reels , where as I think they are too free running.
I prefer my Browning reel for my Barbel and feeder fishing (excellent drag and line lay).If you are happy using something , what is wrong with that?.
 
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Alan Cooper

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As Keith Finn notes: nowt mate. However, I have two Diawa reels which I bought for carp fishing and I think the line lay is absolutely disgusting. I have since invested in a Shimano 6010GT and the difference is between chalk and cheese - the Shimano been the "big cheese."
 
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Alan Roe

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To Alan Rounder the best thing I can think of is to flog your rolling pin and obtain a Richard Carter centerpin I have had two of them for years and they are wonderful. I have never had any problems with them at all.
The other problem with the rolling pin type of reel is that the side cast facillity puts a twist in the line.
I note that you use the Wallis cast so you don't need the side cast facillity you will also find that a true centerpin acton is quicker off the mark than a reel with ball bearings in it when it comes to Wallis casting as there is less inertia to overcome so casting is easier.
 
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John Walker

Guest
i normally use a shimano biomaster 4000,the origional type and set the clutch quite lightly and use fingertip control on the rim of the spool i have never had any problem with this reel and it retreives at a fair old rate and operates really smooth
 
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