Striking

Tim Ford

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Am having problems hooking the fish when the float goes under. Whenever I strike I miss the fish.

Does hook size and bait size affect this or is it just about timing!
 

Bryan Baron 2

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Timming. It will help if you keep the line between the rod and float as tight as you can. This is usually helped by sinking the line after casting.

The only way a hook size or bait size will affect it is if they are to big for the size of fish there and they are just pulling the bait.
 

jp

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Hooks can be too small as well.

The first piece of advice I was ever given a long time ago when I was missing bites was to try a bigger hook and on that occasion it worked.
(Changed from a 16 to a 12 with three maggots on iirc.)
 
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Shrek

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Tim, I don't want what level of angling you are at or how much you now already, however you might find these ARTICLES of some use to you.
 
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Ron Troversial Clay

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Timing the strike when you are float fishing, especially for roach, is one of the great skills of angling.

All I can say is to imagine what the fish is doing under water. One thing I will say is that if you get sucked maggots or crushed casters, the fish has had the bait and you did not strike at the right time. This is the time to experiment with shotting depth and float type.

It's all a matter of a big learning curve.
 
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Ron Troversial Clay

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And by the way, when your float goes under, you are probably too late.
 

Tim Ford

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Thanks everyone.

Ron, thanks for your last reply. I was under the impression that you stike when the float goes under!

How much movement should the float do before I strike.

ps. I don't know if you remember but you helped on a previous topic of mine, so just to let you know on my first trip I caught 2 small roach, a very slimy bream and a mirror and common carp bot about 6-7lb!

Thanks for your help.
 

Jonny Field

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just reading the messages and one says if you strike when the float is under your probably too late can you expand on this because i am only a beginner and i have had trouble with missed bites thanks
 
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jason fisher

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if it is still moving downwards you are in with a chance of connecting with the bite but most beginners make the mistake of not striking till the float has completely disappeared by which time with small species like roach they have already spit the bait out.
 

Jonny Field

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to jason thanks for the advice do you think i should strike as soon as i see a little movement in the float
 
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jason fisher

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if it look like it's going to disapper then strike, you are asking one of the most difficult questions in fishing and one unfortunately which you only learn the answer to with experience.
probably the best advice i could give is keep striking earlier and earlier till you start missing them all the time then you will know what is too soon.
this changes from species to species and day to day as well though.
 
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big boy

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Tim,
i know what it is like when you strike and there is no fish on the end of your line it happens to me all the time.
 
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Ron Troversial Clay

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I know it sounds daft but in many cases with roach it's true.

I fish a local pit quite often where the roach average over the pound. You learn to time the strike just as the float begins to move.

Wait for it to disappear and you strike fresh air.
 

Mark Shinton 2

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That's a fair comment concerning Roach, but not all fish. I just did'nt want People being any more confused then they already may be.
 

Alan Tyler

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Decidedly un-daft; if a roach decides a bait isn't quite right, the bait will get spat out far more forcefully than it was taken in - so you get a faint flicker as the fish takes, and a full-blooded dip as it rejects the bait.
 

Baz

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More importantly, make sure youre float is dotted down to the merest dimple.
This way you weil see the slightest movement, and wait until it goes under.

A trick of the match lads it to shot the float so that it "just" sinks.
What you do then is to smear the top of the float with vaseline, so that only the tension of the water is holding it up.
Use this method for fishing just off the bottom.

If you are fishing on the bottom, say by 6"-8"
Try either deepening or shallowing up in order to give the fish more time to take the bait properly. This last part is trial and error.
 
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