The local tackle shop.

luremanmike

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As the title would suggest this is going to be about local tackle shops, so basically do you support yours??. I admit i buy most my rods and etc on-line and use the tackle shop for bait and small things like hooks and swivels, i have friends that travel to the next town over to go to tackle shop there as the prices are better.
 

PitsfordPirate

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As the title would suggest this is going to be about local tackle shops, so basically do you support yours??. I admit i buy most my rods and etc on-line and use the tackle shop for bait and small things like hooks and swivels, i have friends that travel to the next town over to go to tackle shop there as the prices are better.
Yes I do support mine, a small affair and expensive in comparison to online tackle sites but am happy to put some business their way for the advice on local waters and they also sell all the day/season/club tickets.

Apart from my maggots and worms, I always pick up a feeder/packet of hooks or two/groundbait/pellets, amazing how quickly you can build up a collection without noticing the cost.

The Pirate.
 
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Will Barnard

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I use a number of local tackle shops. I help a mate out in his on occasion. I find it interesting when people travel up to 17 miles to the shop for a pint of maggots and moan about their previous local shops closing down and the hassle it has caused them.

They then spout on about the new rod/bedchair etc that they bought online from a tackle shop based in a region with no overheads that enables them to sell cheaply...go figure.

Are people expecting 'bait shops' now?
 

maceo

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I'm pretty much the same. I buy bait, hooks, floats and small bits and pieces there and try to support it as much as I can. I really value the ability to buy fresh bait locally and would hate to lose it. Two tackle shops around here have closed down recently in Eynsham and Farringdon and if it weren't for my local shop I'd have to go right into Oxford to buy maggots.

However I just can't afford to buy the big stuff such as rods and reels etc there when I can get the same thing for much less by comparing various internet sites.

I also have to say I find it a little bit intimidating. One of the big advantages over the internet should be the ability to have a look at things like rod holdalls and seat boxes etc and unzip pockets and try things for weight and portability etc. If I could do that, I'd be more inclined to buy big stuff down there.

Normally I just don't feel like that's an option though, under the withering gaze of the manager and the two or three people who always seem to be hanging around the counter chatting. There's a bit of an atmosphere of 'you touch it - you buy it'. Understandable in some ways I suppose - they don't want their stuff getting worn and dirty.

Better are these huge 'Go Outdoors' type places where you can finger the goods, wind the reels and stick your nose into the luggage without anyone bothering you.
 

bennygesserit

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you have to factor in the refund factor , is it worth saving 15 quid if it takes a month to send something back ?

I pay a little big extra for some larger items , I aint rich , in order to support my local shop.

Look him in the eye when you buy your maggots having just spent 500 quid online - that helps
 

Will Barnard

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Fair point Maceo, that is something that occurs and is probably intensified by the shop owners need and eagerness for you to buy it plus his/her experience of people coming in to get a visual on the items before buying cheaper online.
A vicious circle if you like, perhaps the trouble with many hobbyists opening a shop as opposed to pragmatic business people.

Certainly these tackle shops that has regulars are intimidating, however, often, the shop owner knows this but doesnt feel they can do anything about it.

you explain it to the 'regulars' who take exception and never come to the shop again
or
you keep schtum and hope you convey an eagerness to please new comers enough without upsetting the regulars

I have noticed that a lot of shopkeepers respond well to confident customers who openly state what they are interested in etc on entrance to the store.
 

markhib

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I support three tackle shops around North London having recently returned to angling. Knowing my situation the locals were equally as helpful as the staff about places to fish, bait etc. and remarkably friendly. I've bought stuff online too and once you factor in postage, I don't see a massive difference. Mind you I'm not buying top of the range equipment.
Mark
 

Peter Jacobs

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I drive the 16 miles to my 'local' shop, passing 2 others on the way, and remembering my Rangey does just 3 miles to the pound.

I rarely buy on-line unless it is someting that Dave Moody cannot supply from his shop at Witherington Farm Lakes. Usually I will ask Dave to order in if not in the shop. I prefer to get my maggot and caster from his shop too as the quality is always reliable.

I far prefer the friendly chat with one of the best anglers in the region, there is a decent cafe there too so after a bit of 'retail therapy' its a cup of coffee and a bacon buttie for me before I drive home.

The alternative is the faceless shopping of the Internet, waiting for Postage and in my case as I'm not home during the week then having to drive to the Post Office to collect whatever I have bought.

For my fly fishing requirements I use the Orvis shop in Stockbridge which is also about 15 miles from my home, and usually combine the trip with lunch at one of the pub's or restaurants in the village, and a sneaky look at the Test as well.

Give me the personal service, the friendly chat and a cuppa every time.
 

dezza

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My local shop - Dave Parkes Tackle of Rotherham, is closing down in December, just before Christmas.

Old Dave has had enough, he is 75 and wants to retire. No-one wants to take on the shop, which has been there for almost 40 years! So in future when I want maggots, casters and other stuff I will have to drive 10 miles or so, instead of a 5 minute free busride.

Such a shame.
 
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Remember that many of the online retailers are actually local tackle shops. They do have overheads, but they have invested in their business to move with the times and ensure they keep profitable via additional online sales.
 

Peter Jacobs

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Remember that many of the online retailers are actually local tackle shops. They do have overheads, but they have invested in their business to move with the times and ensure they keep profitable via additional online sales.
I totally agree Matt, my favorite shop has done the same, but I would still rather drive down there than order on-line, where I can chat to the owner and handle the goods for myself.

Personal preferrence of course and one that probably stems from when the local tackle shop always had the aroma of linseed oil and maggots in the air.
 

Frank Elson

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My "local" is out of the way in a nearby town, but my wife likes to shop there so I always pop in and buy a handful of something. Like someone said above, feeders and hooks add up to a nice bag full if I just buy every now and again.

I was going to buy a carryall online, spotted some in the shop and he got four down, we looked at them all and I chose one that I hadn't thought of online. Saving money is fine, but you can't beat the personal service and looking over something before you buy.

There is a shop nearer, but like others here I felt intimidated by the clique of his pals all standing around with a brew.
 

sam vimes

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My local shop - Dave Parkes Tackle of Rotherham, is closing down in December, just before Christmas.

Old Dave has had enough, he is 75 and wants to retire. No-one wants to take on the shop, which has been there for almost 40 years!
I've seen a different story elsewhere that puts another slant on it. The suggestion was that the landlord wouldn't allow the business to be sold as a going concern in the current premises.
 

little oik

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I use my "local "tackle shops all the time .I tend to use the net to get tackle etc which is not stocked by them. Usually there is a minimum order for Equipment so you have some choices .Wait till they got enough for an order .Pay the extra cost .Or order it yourself from a mail order company.
 

barbelboi

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As I’ve mentioned in previous threads I’m fortunate to have a brilliant local tackle shop that I have been using for a great many years. A bonus being that, apart from their own fresh natural baits (I just don't like flatpack casters), they stock/order just about all the main player items I could wish for. The only items I need to get elsewhere are Pro-Gold/Clear and a certain 'species' of rod/s.
Jerry
 

Simon K

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Remember that many of the online retailers are actually local tackle shops. They do have overheads, but they have invested in their business to move with the times and ensure they keep profitable via additional online sales.
Very much a double-edged sword.

To compete with "pure" on-line retailing you put your shelf products up online at a greatly reduced profit-margin. You then have to sell many more of these to create the same profit, which consumes more overheads.

You borrow money from the bank to have a higher level of stock to satisfy the increase in online business and more labour to fulfill the ordering and mailing process. The reduction in "cash" sales and increase in credit card takes more profit away in the form of card commissions and bank processing charges.
Meanwhile your existing walk-in trade switches to buying from you online since they realise they get the same products cheaper that way, so you lose some of the "impulse" spending they would normally make in wandering around your store.

If you're lucky enough to be a big enough (and reliable) business that suppliers will give a months credit to, then that could well pay off if you manage to turn it over in that time-period, but many are not in that position.
Compared to many businesses tackle shops have a vast outlay in shelf stock (if they're any good) and have an awful lot of capital tied up for the turnover that stock generates.

I buy most of my consumable stuff from my local shop(s), but sometimes have to go online for the more esoteric items. More and more I find I buy expensive kit online simply for the savings, not that I need to buy much of it. By sticking as much as poss to quality brands you reduce the "refund" factor mentioned earlier.
 

Jamesy

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Local mainly, online for blow-out times (Xmas-Bday) although I've made major purchases at local stores twice recently and both times they did me a deal. The 'know-it-all' clique can be intimidating, especially for newcomers and the returning lapsed. I think if Tackle shops employed enthusiastic but ignorant young women to meet and greet a lot more people would get over their initial resevre.
 

Lord Paul of Sheffield

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I use 2 local shop regularly and a 3rd on occasions, I buy rods and reels from Climax but buy in shop but

I have and will againg buy rods and reels from my local tackel shops - they are often a bit dearer but once they know you will spend a few quid I've had free bait given me or a free spool of line when spending a bit
 

pellethead15

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i have some great shops in my area,"tacklesaver" wilmslow,great shop which if you become a member £15 per year everything you buy is at a ten percent discount,...also "daves of middlewich" another fine establishment,i was in there today and bought a korum rod holdall."Valeroyal angling"is another good shop.
i love the smell of tackle shops,all that sweet smelling bait and carbon gets me going lol.
 

terry m

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I drive the 16 miles to my 'local' shop, passing 2 others on the way, and remembering my Rangey does just 3 miles to the pound.

I rarely buy on-line unless it is someting that Dave Moody cannot supply from his shop at Witherington Farm Lakes. Usually I will ask Dave to order in if not in the shop. I prefer to get my maggot and caster from his shop too as the quality is always reliable.

I far prefer the friendly chat with one of the best anglers in the region, there is a decent cafe there too so after a bit of 'retail therapy' its a cup of coffee and a bacon buttie for me before I drive home.

The alternative is the faceless shopping of the Internet, waiting for Postage and in my case as I'm not home during the week then having to drive to the Post Office to collect whatever I have bought.

For my fly fishing requirements I use the Orvis shop in Stockbridge which is also about 15 miles from my home, and usually combine the trip with lunch at one of the pub's or restaurants in the village, and a sneaky look at the Test as well.

Give me the personal service, the friendly chat and a cuppa every time.
When I grew up in Salisbury, the John Eadie emporium ruled with old Tom Burden and younger Kevin Clubb being the fonts of all local knowledge. Is John Eadies still going?
 
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