Trout on lures

Molehill

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I have just thought of a better idea (after gin :)) you have a 50 acre gravel pit in southern half of England, no fish in it, mixed depths including say 20ft, no water quality problems.

Give me a business plan to support you and family that includes trout and lure fishing.
 

Krang

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I have just thought of a better idea (after gin :)) you have a 50 acre gravel pit in southern half of England, no fish in it, mixed depths including say 20ft, no water quality problems.

Give me a business plan to support you and family that includes trout and lure fishing.
Just stock the water with trout and charge people to fish there. Same as places like Bewl now do since almost going bankrupt due to only allowing fly fishing. I don't need to spend hours figuring out the numbers to know that that business model works.

I'd also open a tackle shop on site, stocking it with the best selection of lures in the area. Wouldn't be too hard since most places don't have that many. So I'd have that source of income in addition to the tickets.
 

Krang

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Krang. Is it just an attention seeking game you’re playing?
There’s nothing remotely interesting in any of your post infect everything you have posted can be found on google or you tube
Why don’t you post in the trout forum on FM and see how far you get on there!!!
What trout forum? Trout were predators last time I checked. Personally I think a lure forum on here would be good.
 
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flightliner

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I've just read the word "Bass" , I've seen hundreds in the parko di Cava in Milan.
How anyone would want to catch them 'orrible critters is beyond me, give me a nice bag of roach anyday!!
 

Krang

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I've just read the word "Bass" , I've seen hundreds in the parko di Cava in Milan.
How anyone would want to catch them 'orrible critters is beyond me, give me a nice bag of roach anyday!!
That's what I think when I see the deformed carp so many here love so much (platonic I'm sure). Bream too to an extent. Roach look OK but aren't very I interesting. None are a patch on trout. Not just great fun to catch but a fascinating species; particularly the brown trout and its diverse populations, with their adaptations to their particular niches within their habitats. In some places you have two populations adapted to different niches and they don't interbreed.
 
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Molehill

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Just stock the water with trout and charge people to fish there. Same as places like Bewl now do since almost going bankrupt due to only allowing fly fishing. I don't need to spend hours figuring out the numbers to know that that business model works.

I'd also open a tackle shop on site, stocking it with the best selection of lures in the area. Wouldn't be too hard since most places don't have that many. So I'd have that source of income in addition to the tickets.
I don't think Bewl is a very good example for your case, nor do I think that allowing anglers to fish any method will be the saviour of it and if that is your idea of a business model for a trout fishery you are probably doomed. Let's have a look at Bewl water, which advertise along with angling......

Aqua park, walking, bike hire, sailing, wind surfing, open water swimming, canoes, paddle boarding, pedalos, rowing, childrens adventure play area, kids parties, soft play, laser challenge, weddings, private parties, corporate events, coach parties, accomodation, film location, christmas parties, camping, bistro, cafe, tackle shop, triathlon, dragon boat festival. I won't go on and have probably missed some.

Then have a look at the accounts for 2019 (Salomons, available online and you can find them), I'm sure you understand those finances better than me but I shall just cut to Loss for financial year : £2,085,378. Which is better than previously. Wonder how much of that is fishing?
My point being, that if you honestly believe simply letting anglers use lures for trout is the answer you are in cloud cuckoo land.
 

steve2

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Much of the Trout fishing in this country died out with the change to coarse fishing season. Nothing will bring it back. Carp can be caught time and time again most trout are only caught once so financially why would anyone stock trout.
 

Peter Jacobs

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Just stock the water with trout and charge people to fish there. Same as places like Bewl now do since almost going bankrupt due to only allowing fly fishing. I don't need to spend hours figuring out the numbers to know that that business model works.

I'd also open a tackle shop on site, stocking it with the best selection of lures in the area. Wouldn't be too hard since most places don't have that many. So I'd have that source of income in addition to the tickets.
IF this is your Business Plan then my best advice to you is:






DON'T GIVE UP YOUR DAY JOB.
 

markcw

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Just stock the water with trout and charge people to fish there. Same as places like Bewl now do since almost going bankrupt due to only allowing fly fishing. I don't need to spend hours figuring out the numbers to know that that business model works.

I'd also open a tackle shop on site, stocking it with the best selection of lures in the area. Wouldn't be too hard since most places don't have that many. So I'd have that source of income in addition to the tickets.
Have you priced your from a fish farm to stock you fantasy water. ?
And would it be done on catch and release or catch and knock them on the head like a few places do. ?
If knock them on the head, you would have to be stocking all the time, have all the relevant paperwork.
It not a case of digging a hole in the ground and putting fish in it. For trout you would need a good filtration system, continuous movement of water.
Like someone said dont give up your day job.
 

Krang

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Farmoor doesn't have continuous moving water. Nor do lochs and lakes with ferox frout, or that icelandic lake with giant "ice age trout". Bibury trout farm has small ponds where kids can go catch trout. I could breed my own trout (maybe from ferox trout) and use their business model, just with a 50 acre lake rather than a small kids one.

Anyway trout can live in the Thames. They could be stocked into the port meadow stretch (where they're occasionally still found) with the money wasted on electro fishing zander and stocking roach in the canal.
 
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Krang

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Much of the Trout fishing in this country died out with the change to coarse fishing season. Nothing will bring it back. Carp can be caught time and time again most trout are only caught once so financially why would anyone stock trout.
Its a shame. But flyonlyism doesn't exactly help. It creates a barrier to entry into trout fishing. If you had more fisheries then the fish would become cheaper due to economies of scale. More people would come to appreciate the trout and be prepared to pay fair prices to fish for them. But that shouldnt include stupidly expensive fly tackle and casting tuition.
 

Peter Jacobs

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If you had even a basic understanding of the economics of breeding and rearing trout for fisheries then you'd realise that economy of scale are only prevalent when the size of the operaion would need to lower its price per unit well below the market averages.

It is a "nice thought" but in reality it is pie-in-the-sky.

I'm not sure exactly what you might consider to be a "fair price" to fish for trout that are almost always only ever caught once, and in fact are much cheaper to buy from the supermarket, although you'll not get the same satisfaction from casting to a rising fish with a particular fly on a particular day . . . . .

In the final anaylsis that is what it is really all about, the derived satifaction of having stalked the rising fish, selecting a fly pattern to match its natural food and then presenting that fly to the trou and feeling the take . . .
 

Krang

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If you had even a basic understanding of the economics of breeding and rearing trout for fisheries then you'd realise that economy of scale are only prevalent when the size of the operaion would need to lower its price per unit well below the market averages.

It is a "nice thought" but in reality it is pie-in-the-sky.

I'm not sure exactly what you might consider to be a "fair price" to fish for trout that are almost always only ever caught once, and in fact are much cheaper to buy from the supermarket, although you'll not get the same satisfaction from casting to a rising fish with a particular fly on a particular day . . . . .

In the final anaylsis that is what it is really all about, the derived satifaction of having stalked the rising fish, selecting a fly pattern to match its natural food and then presenting that fly to the trou and feeling the take . . .
Economies of scale is precisely the reason why supermarket food is so cheap.

By fair price I mean sufficient for the fishery to make a profit. Bibury trout farm prices seem reasonable. If they had a proper fishing lake attached to their farm I'd be there like a shot. It would be the only commercial fishery round here where I could fish for trout.

I understand that people find catching a trout on a fly satisfying but how do you think I felt when I caught that trout on my ultralight spinning gear? The only problem I have with fly fishing is their problem with other methods.

Fly fishing gear is clearly more expensive. Sure the cheapest kits are only around £60. But Decathlon has basic spinning kits for £15. Those are usable but very poor, particularly the reels, the drag is almost like an on/off switch. Who'd want pay £60 to fish with the fly equivalent of that?
 
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s63

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Fly fishing gear is clearly NOT more expensive.

Like any genre of fishing you can make it as cheap or as expensive as you wish. I do a reasonable amount of lure fishing on fresh waters and at sea. There are plenty of lure anglers spending thousands on state of the art rods and reels (especiallly BFS), many of the lures popularly used average £20 a pop. I used a lure rod just today (on the HDYGO thread which you have no interest in), most expensive rod I’ve ever bought at a touch under £300.

If you’re going to continue making these sweeping statements do your research before hitting your warrior keyboard.
 

Krang

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Fly fishing gear is clearly NOT more expensive.

Like any genre of fishing you can make it as cheap or as expensive as you wish. I do a reasonable amount of lure fishing on fresh waters and at sea. There are plenty of lure anglers spending thousands on state of the art rods and reels (especiallly BFS), many of the lures popularly used average £20 a pop. I used a lure rod just today (on the HDYGO thread which you have no interest in), most expensive rod I’ve ever bought at a touch under £300.

If you’re going to continue making these sweeping statements do your research before hitting your warrior keyboard.
Popular lures don't average "£20 a pop". Maybe some Westin lures do but even Rapalas can routinely picked up for £5-£8 online. Cheaper lures, fiver for a fiver do also work. Sure some lure anglers pay for baitcasters and very expensive gear. But you don't need to pay much for a decent set up. You could get a decent rod and a 4bb Daiwa reel for the same price as the cheapest unbranded fly equivalent.
 

steve2

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My lure tackle works out far more expensive than my fly fishing tackle. Although my fly fishing tackle was 'cheap' the venues I fished weren't because of the cost of buying trout to restock regularly. I can remember paying anything up to £50 a day.
Bit of swings and roundabouts lure fishing tackle expensive, cheap to use. Fly fishing tackle cheap to buy expensive to use.
 
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