Trout on lures

Krang

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My lure tackle works out far more expensive than my fly fishing tackle. Although my fly fishing tackle was 'cheap' the venues I fished weren't because of the cost of buying trout to restock regularly. I can remember paying anything up to £50 a day.
Bit of swings and roundabouts lure fishing tackle expensive, cheap to use. Fly fishing tackle cheap to buy expensive to use.
The general price of fly tackle is still far higher though. You buying expensive lure tackle and cheap fly tackle doesn't affect that.
 
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Molehill

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Fly fishing gear is clearly more expensive. Sure the cheapest kits are only around £60. But Decathlon has basic spinning kits for £15. Those are usable but very poor, particularly the reels, the drag is almost like an on/off switch. Who'd want pay £60 to fish with the fly equivalent of that?
You should read what you write first, you say £60 for a fly fishing kit and a basic spinning kit for £15 - that is rubbish! The fly fishing kit at that price is perfectly adequate to fish with.
I can't be bothered to argue it, I'm afraid you are way off the mark with many of your statements and I am saying that as someone who spent many years in the business.
I have nothing against lure fishing for trout and thoroughly enjoy it myself, different methods for different places. Ultimately in trout fisheries you pay for what you catch, whatever method you use, and the owner takes the profit. There is a very good reason there are very few stocked trout fisheries that allow lure fishing - they don't make a profit for the owner!
 

Krang

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You should read what you write first, you say £60 for a fly fishing kit and a basic spinning kit for £15 - that is rubbish! The fly fishing kit at that price is perfectly adequate to fish with.
I can't be bothered to argue it, I'm afraid you are way off the mark with many of your statements and I am saying that as someone who spent many years in the business.
I have nothing against lure fishing for trout and thoroughly enjoy it myself, different methods for different places. Ultimately in trout fisheries you pay for what you catch, whatever method you use, and the owner takes the profit. There is a very good reason there are very few stocked trout fisheries that allow lure fishing - they don't make a profit for the owner!
Sorry but "I used to work in the business" doesn't in its self carry much weight as an argument. If you used to work in the business and are an expert on the topic you should be able to present a reasoned argument backed up with citations.

Here's an article on the topic of Bewl water allowing lure fishing.

Any Method At Bewl - UK Predator Angler

Seems to support my point than the "I'm an expert of the topic and so can with authority that I'm right" style arguments that seem so popular round here would.

Bibury trout farm let's kids fish for trout and pay around £10 per kilo. Are you suggesting that they'd make less profit if they scaled up their business?
 

markcw

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I dont know whether to get the popcorn and read the drivel you keep posting, or walk round Oxford with stones in my shoes, after driving to oxford that is,
How many years experience have you had fishing regardless of method used, and how many forums have you been banned from ?
I reckon you will answer the first question and swerve the second, and if you dont want to answer any on here , scribble your answers in crayon on scrap of paper and I can give you an address to send them to.
 

Molehill

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Sorry but "I used to work in the business" doesn't in its self carry much weight as an argument. If you used to work in the business and are an expert on the topic you should be able to present a reasoned argument backed up with citations.

Here's an article on the topic of Bewl water allowing lure fishing.

Any Method At Bewl - UK Predator Angler

Seems to support my point than the "I'm an expert of the topic and so can with authority that I'm right" style arguments that seem so popular round here would.

Bibury trout farm let's kids fish for trout and pay around £10 per kilo. Are you suggesting that they'd make less profit if they scaled up their business?
The article has him and boat partner both averaging 6 fish each per visit, there is no catch and release on any method and the ticket is $29. My initial thought is that bewl bridge would make a loss on each of them.

You then mention bibury as a comparison charging $10 kilo for caught trout. Let's say the bewl fish average a kilo each (I don't know but that would be a good stocking size), so therefore the above 6 fish at 6 kilos at $10 kilo would be $60 for a ticket to be in profit - by you comparison - I keep coming back to the point of finances and profit.

If you expect a trout fishery set up for lure fishing, especially a smaller fishery it has to be financially viable and the angler has to be prepared to pay. How much would you pay for a day trout fishing with lures. You may pay $40 for a day fishing and have your bag limit in 20 minutes with new stickies. Are you good with that?
 

markcw

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Sorry but "I used to work in the business" doesn't in its self carry much weight as an argument. If you used to work in the business and are an expert on the topic you should be able to present a reasoned argument backed up with citations.

Here's an article on the topic of Bewl water allowing lure fishing.

Any Method At Bewl - UK Predator Angler

Seems to support my point than the "I'm an expert of the topic and so can with authority that I'm right" style arguments that seem so popular round here would.

Bibury trout farm let's kids fish for trout and pay around £10 per kilo. Are you suggesting that they'd make less profit if they scaled up their business?
Around 30 years ago, myself and 9 others had a decent sized pool dug out on the land of a farmer we knew, Before we had even thought of stocking it ( more of fish to stocked later) we had to put aside money for the first years rental, negotiate the cost of hiring his digger and driver, any removal /dispersment of waste soil and anything that may come to light in digging the pool, We started off by each putting £200 into the kitty, Then came the cost of plants, water testing samples, all this before we had even put a fish in it,
The fish that were going in were from a reputable fish farm, all health certified, We even had a clubs fisheries manager on board for advice.
The fish that were going in initially were tench, some crucians silvers and perch, No carp because we did not want them hybridizing with the crucians, that £2000 did not last long before we put more money into it.
This was not done as a money making venture, it was done so 10 blokes and if any spaces on the day their immediate family could fish.
If we had done it as a day ticket water, we would be on a loss for quite a long time, there were insurances to consider, VAT, strict safety aspects.Also once stocked it was not fished for 6 months ,this was to acclimatise the fish and also to see if any fatalities showed up.
So if you think with your "I'm the expert view" digging a hole in the ground and bunging a few fish in yhen waiting for the money to come rolling in , You go for it.
Or take the word of someone who has done his homework and found it is not viable .
 
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steve2

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Bibury trout farm let's kids fish for trout and pay around £10 per kilo
That strikes me as being a very expensive way of going trout fishing, although these type of ponds aren't really trout fishing just a money spinner on the side of the business.
Bit like the ones where they will sell you a bag of fish food to feed the fish for them.
 

markcw

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Sounds like one in yorkshire, you can see the trout going for the bait, and with the thickness of the line on the reels you could land a cod on the outfit.
Kids like catching and fishery rakes it in. It's a catch and kill policy, no catch limit either.
 

valetudoguy

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Lots of "course" fisheries are very close to fly only trout fisheries and have similar conditions. Many gravel pits have sufficient depths to retain cool enough water for trout yet these are usually stocked with carp etc.. I don't know a single fishery that stocks both carp and trout. Its always either/or. In some cases, such as shallow venues, your point holds up but there are many cases where the culprit is this outdated "course"/game distinction. Other places, such as the US, view trout as just another game fish alongside bass, perch, walleye etc.. Their fishing gets along perfectly nicely like that. Often they stock rainbow trout for winter fishing when the other species stop feeding.

Pendle view stocked trout and carp for many years before it closed. The trout were officially seperated by a netting, but I have seen numerous large trout fall to carp tactics, so they obviously got through and grow to pretty decent sized.
 
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