Under 12 how many rods can they use

Clikfire

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I usually use two rods when fishing, but when I take my 11 year old daughter can she also use two rods?

I was thinking of setting up my rod pod and letting her use the rod nearest to her as well as a float rod to keep her interested, but as she doesn't yet need a rod and line licence I wondered if there is any rules I don't know about.
 
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Phil Hackett 2

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My understanding is that under 12s are entitled like any other angler to use up to a maximum of four, if the club, fishery?s owner allows that many to be used.
Whether this is desirable, practical etc, given the young persons skill level is a matter for debate.
 
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Wolfman Woody

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Good point, Clive!

The fact that we need one licence for two rods and two licences for 3 or 4 rods. One imagines that a youngster could use two quite legitimately since that is what one licence would allow them. However, since they have to buy the second licence either, they could use 4. In fact, if they are not governed by the licencing rules at all, they could use ten if they wished, I suppose.

Like Phil says though, would you want them to use more than 2?
 
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Wolfman Woody

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"However, since they DON'T have to buy the second licence either, they could use 4."

Corrected!
 

Peter Jacobs

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Not that I'd want to argue with Phil, but my understanding is slightly different.

The fact that under 12's do not need a licence is by concession.
The concession is granted against the ordinary (adult) licence which is normally for 2 rods.
Therefore I'd suggest that 2 rods would be allowable.

I fully agree with Phil though on the topic of 4 rods versus a youngster's skill level.

Interesting question.
 
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The Monk

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so If I fill my bivvy with loads of under 12 year olds, I can legally set up loads of rod pods full of rods, two per each kid in the bivvy?

I can see great potential here for the child care orientated time bandit!
 

Peter Jacobs

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Oh you can just imagine it, can't you?

Uncle Monk, I'm thirsty
Uncle Monk, I need the toilet
Uncle Monk, Johnny has eaten all yer boilies
Uncle Monk, Chrissy has fallen in the lake
Uncle Monk, Johnny's been sick all over yer bedchair
Uncle Monk, Christian just stepped on your rod pod and bust it
Uncle Monk, I'm hungry
Uncle Monk, can we have Ice Cream?

Nope, I'll stick to fishing on my own or with grown ups - or what passes for them at any rate :)

Uncle Monk, Ron's just fired your catapult at that copper and he's bleedin'mad about it too.
 
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The Monk

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hahahahahahaha, yes that brings back some memories mate!!, the things you have to do to cast a few extra rods out haha
 
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Phil Hackett 2

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Peter it is an interesting question so I'll make some inquiries from people I know who were involved in the negotiations with the EA about the 4 rod limit???..Later!
 

Bob Roberts

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I think the key decider in this matter may be whether the rods are "under control".

Inexperienced youngsters might find it difficult to keep two rods "under control" never mind four.

But it leads onto another issue. What if they break a byelaw? Lets say they are pike fishing and spread their rods out as some adults do (illegally). They are too young to prosecute. They aren't forced to fish with an adult as far as I can see. So if you happen to be with them when they break a rule, who takes the rap?
 
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Les Clark

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Bob ,The adult with them at the time I would say ,the adult should know the bylaws and pass it on to the youngsters....IF they are in your care ,if not get the hell out of there ,I wouldn`t go near any youngsters these days ,too dodgy ,sad old world ,but you have to be carefull .
 
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Wolfman Woody

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"They are too young to prosecute." Only if they're 10 or under - ie. below the age of criminal responsibility.
 
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Les Clark

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Good point Woody but I think you are splitting hairs ,with a adult in tow who are they going to go for ?
 
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jason fisher

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yes monk at the point you go clinically senile they let you off with lots of crimes, dribbling, going out wearing a cardigan, driving like a complete arsehole.
 

Clikfire

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Thanks to you all, for all your responses.

I just don't want any hassle, other than the ones Monk mentioned above which made me laugh.

Taking one at a time isn't that bad though Monk, its more about how many times they get there line tangled when they forget the bail arm etc. And as the write ups on this site testify its great to see there joy as they catch fish for the first time.
 

Peter Jacobs

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Clive,

It is great to see the youngster's face when they catch - pure magic. Although my experience is that you have to try to ensure that they are catching regularly, so I'd opt for a short whip - 3 to 4 meters with line to hand for those periods when the rods on the pod lay still and silent.

Either way, father/daughter time spent out fishing is the true definition of 'quality time' in my opinion.
 

Clikfire

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Cheers Peter,

couldn't agree more. But I don't have a whip and have never used one myself, so she had to learn to use a proper float rod from the start, tough in the short term but beneficial in the end I think.

I did do some practise casting with her in the back garden prior to letting her lose on the lakes, which I think helped raise her confidence.

This Sunday I am going to try to help her catch her first carp, and like Jeff Woodhouse has done recently mabe win her a cap or similar.
 
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