Waterway wanderers permit

POLEMINATOR

Well-known member
Having never been approached by a bailiff, I was wondering who checks you have a waterway wanderers permit when your fishing on a canal ?

Would it be same bailiff that checks you have a rod licence or somebody different ?

I'm guessing it would be different being 2 different agencies ?

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steve2

Well-known member
Never heard of the waterway wanders permit till you mentioned. I would assume they can check both your licence and permit.
 

POLEMINATOR

Well-known member
Never heard of the waterway wanders permit till you mentioned. I would assume they can check both your licence and permit.
Being honest I only found out about it recently,

Rod licence is environment agency I think,

And the wanderers permit ( right to fish permit ) is the canal and river trust

Fishing without a licence would be an environment agency issue,

but would fishing with a licence in a location that you dont have the right to fish be an environment agency issue ?

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peter crabtree

Well-known member
The C & RT.often haven't got enough staff to come out to an incident ( dewatering for instance ) so I doubt very much they'd come along checking if you had one of their wanderers permits.
 

keora

Well-known member
Being honest I only found out about it recently,

Rod licence is environment agency I think,

And the wanderers permit ( right to fish permit ) is the canal and river trust

Fishing without a licence would be an environment agency issue,

but would fishing with a licence in a location that you dont have the right to fish be an environment agency issue ?

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The money received from the purchase of rod licences is spent by the Environment Agency on fishery related improvements. For example, the EA in recent years has stocked chub and barbel in a river which I fish. The club didn't have to pay for them. In a way, the rod licence is a tax on owning a rod.

If an angler is fishing in a location where he does not have a permit to do so, it's not the responsibility of the EA to take action. Instead, it's the responsibility of the fishing club or landowner, which has the fishing rights to act.

You can ask the angler, who is committing a crime (theft of fishing rights) to leave. They usually do. If they don't, then you could contact the police. Whether they have the time to attend is another matter.
 
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POLEMINATOR

Well-known member
The money received from the purchase of rod licences is spent by the Environment Agency on fishery related improvements. For example, the EA in recent years has stocked chub and barbel in a river which I fish. The club didn't have to pay for them. In a way, the rod licence is a tax on owning a rod.

If an angler is fishing in a location where he does not have a permit to do so, it's not the responsibility of the EA to take action. Instead, it's the responsibility of the fishing club or landowner, which has the fishing rights to act.

You can ask the angler, who is committing a crime (theft of fishing rights) to leave. They usually do. If they don't, then you could contact the police. Whether they have the time to attend is another matter.
So in this case it is the canal and river trust who needs to check an angler has a permit to fish on there canal not the EA bailiff ?

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markcw

Well-known member
Some of the stretches are also day ticket as far as I am aware, even though come under C&RT card so you could be asked to pay a day price, Also clubs control stretches in between C&RT stretches so make sure you are not on a club stretch.
 

steve2

Well-known member
Some of the stretches are also day ticket as far as I am aware, even though come under C&RT card so you could be asked to pay a day price, Also clubs control stretches in between C&RT stretches so make sure you are not on a club stretch.
It does seem strange that all the places listed nearest to me are club leased day ticket waters.
 

tigger

Well-known member
Wherever you fish in england and Wales you have to have a EA licence to fish legally (unfortunately).
You also need any other relevant licences for the water your fishing.
 

POLEMINATOR

Well-known member
So basically if your fishing a canal, the right to fish either belongs to a fishing club which you will have to pay to fish or the canal and river trust who you will have to pay to fish, so there is no free fishing on canals,

Looks like this comes down to the fish being classed legally as property and them being the owners of the fish in there waters,

Rivers should be different because in law a wild animal is not classed as property so rights to it cant be claimed,

So when a river meets a canal how does that work ?,

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rich66

Well-known member
So basically if your fishing a canal, the right to fish either belongs to a fishing club which you will have to pay to fish or the canal and river trust who you will have to pay to fish, so there is no free fishing on canals,

Looks like this comes down to the fish being classed legally as property and them being the owners of the fish in there waters,

Rivers should be different because in law a wild animal is not classed as property so rights to it cant be claimed,

So when a river meets a canal how does that work ?,

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It all depends on who is the riperian owner I would assume.
I do believe fish are property on Stillwater. How this equates to canals and rivers I do not know. I just know in the uk someone somewhere holds or leases the Angling rights to more or less everything. Some land owners allow free fishing eg city councils in their parks etc. Leicester city council you can fish the soar as it flows through abbey park, a beautiful bit of water but I reckon you’d be mugged for your kit at some point !
 

chrissh

Well-known member
So basically if your fishing a canal, the right to fish either belongs to a fishing club which you will have to pay to fish or the canal and river trust who you will have to pay to fish, so there is no free fishing on canals,

Looks like this comes down to the fish being classed legally as property and them being the owners of the fish in there waters,

Rivers should be different because in law a wild animal is not classed as property so rights to it cant be claimed,

So when a river meets a canal how does that work ?,

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I had a quick google and found this regarding fish as wild animals

Wildlife includes those wild animals that are not domesticated and are not in captivity. At one time, the term referred only to those birds and mammals considered to be game animals. ... wildlife traditionally did not include fish, which were considered to be a separate group
 

rayner

Well-known member
Rich66 is bang on with his reference to riperian owner. You pay the riperian owner to fish from his land. Not sure about the fish being anyones property.
 

markcw

Well-known member
Rich66 is bang on with his reference to riperian owner. You pay the riperian owner to fish from his land. Not sure about the fish being anyones property.
This has been mentioned in our club concerning poaching, I cant remember the exact answer our fisheries manager gave, but as far as I am aware canals and enclosed waters are different than rivers,
I will see if I can find thread on club forum and copy it out.
 
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