What is Traditional Angling?

S-Kippy

Well-known member
Tilley hats aren’t meant to be jammed on your loaf, the Tilley recommendation is that you should be able to fit 2 fingers between hat and head for a relaxed fit. If the wind really gets up you can use the chinstrap cord but I never have and never had one blow off.
I have yet to meet the hat that I can get a single finger between bonce and brim let alone two. In medical terms I am above the 97th quartile which, in laymans terms, means big head. What can I tell you ?
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
I have yet to meet the hat that I can get a single finger between bonce and brim let alone two. In medical terms I am above the 97th quartile which, in laymans terms, means big head. What can I tell you ?
Tilley do hats above size 8. I suspect that yoou'd have to have encephalitis to fail to get one to fit.
 

David Rogers 3

Well-known member
I never realised until it was pointed out recently that they rotated in the wrong direction. I never had a problem using them and they were my go to work horse for over 30 years. It was only recently that I sold the last ones. I do still have a small Mitchell 308 in prefect working order.
I could never see what the problem was, as I thought all reels were like that. It was only quite recently I realised that was because, being left-handed, I'd only ever used a 301!

I quite happily mix vintage and modern tackle, baits and methods, depending on what I feel like. For example, yesterday I was hurling solid PVA bags of chopped boilies with an early 1960s Rudge split cane salmon spinning rod and a Mitchell 307. Now the bale arm on that DOES go the wrong way...
 

Philip

Well-known member
Of course there are no hard & fast rules but I think its fair to say traditional angling is generally less succsessful than modern angling. Traditional anglers also tend to spend allot of time complaining about other methods.
 

steve2

Well-known member
I suppose what I did today was more Vintage, a rod 20 plus years old , a centrepin 50years old , and modern pole float set up. Couldn't find any quill floats in my collection.
 

S-Kippy

Well-known member
Tilley do hats above size 8. I suspect that yoou'd have to have encephalitis to fail to get one to fit.
I know I could almost certainly get a Tilley to fit me....but I'm just far too tight to pay that sort of money for a titfer.
 

puffer_

Well-known member
I finally buckled and bought one the other week. Got to say.... It's brilliant. My noggin is fairly large, 7 & 5/8

As for traditional angling, I just take it to be general float fishing or ledgering on maggots/corn/bread/hemp etc with no new fangled gear or baits. I suppose a 20+ year old rod and reel would make it somewhat more traditional.
 

Aknib

Well-known member
I think the idea of the 'traditional' angler is very much like beauty and that it exists mainly in the eye of those who consider themselves the beholder.

Not least because tradition can't be linked to single, identifiable period in time.

I get many an odd glance these days but what most probably fail to realise is that I've done the years of waving fourteen metres of carbon around on an aluminium platform and a seat that resembles a chest of drawers and, though it's taken some thought and a lot of time, my fishing has never been in a more content place than now.

I will go out of my way to buy what I want to use and what I like but, as these images demonstrate, despite them having an undertone of 'tradition' the tackle used is decades apart in origin and that's my happy medium.

I don't for one minute consider myself a 'traditional' angler and I have nothing against anyone who does if it makes them happy but I do smile to myself on the occasions that I get labelled as one...



 

bracket

Well-known member
Just googled the definition of "traditional" one of which is "long established". I have been fishing now for 70 odd years, doing basically the same thing with the tackle that was available at any given time. Dispite never owning any hat other than a flat cap. I think I qualify as a traditional angler without needing to justify it. Pete.7
 
Last edited:

d.owens

Well-known member
I understand the appeal of vintage gear, just feel ancient now the stuff I used when I was younger is now considered almost antique.
I'm the product of a working class council estate in Lverpool and cut my angling teeth on the canal and park lakes, not sure I could carry off the tweeds and deer stalker look too convincingly? Yet I do hold a certain nostalgia for my old fishing tackle, would be very happy to have my old basket, Mitchell reel and Shakespeare float rod today.
I was called "real old school" by a young lad who was chatting to me on Stanley Park lake, this just meant I wasn't carp fishing with all the modern gear. I think there are two lines to be drawn? If you don't buy into the modern carp fishing ethos, and enjoy all round angling with fairly simple tackle, some would label you a traditional angler. Those that worship at the altar of Chris Yates, and dress like extras from Downton Abbey, label themselves as traditional anglers.
I use modern carbon rods, they are miles better than any I owned as a youngster, but I deliberately fish in as uncomplicated way as possible, enjoy the simplicity and the freedom from not carting about enough gear to fill a bungalow. Each to their own. I'm a little bit traditional, a dash of minimalist and a bit dollop of grumpy old git stuck in his ways.
 

steve2

Well-known member
I understand the appeal of vintage gear, just feel ancient now the stuff I used when I was younger is now considered almost antique.
I'm the product of a working class council estate in Lverpool and cut my angling teeth on the canal and park lakes, not sure I could carry off the tweeds and deer stalker look too convincingly? Yet I do hold a certain nostalgia for my old fishing tackle, would be very happy to have my old basket, Mitchell reel and Shakespeare float rod today.
I was called "real old school" by a young lad who was chatting to me on Stanley Park lake, this just meant I wasn't carp fishing with all the modern gear. I think there are two lines to be drawn? If you don't buy into the modern carp fishing ethos, and enjoy all round angling with fairly simple tackle, some would label you a traditional angler. Those that worship at the altar of Chris Yates, and dress like extras from Downton Abbey, label themselves as traditional anglers.
I use modern carbon rods, they are miles better than any I owned as a youngster, but I deliberately fish in as uncomplicated way as possible, enjoy the simplicity and the freedom from not carting about enough gear to fill a bungalow. Each to their own. I'm a little bit traditional, a dash of minimalist and a bit dollop of grumpy old git stuck in his ways.
Like you I use modern tackle in old school ways. Even people like Chris Yates are not "traditional anglers" they are "old school anglers". You would have to go much further back with tackle to be a true "traditional angler", there would be no splitcane rods or fixed spool reels. It appears that they have just plucked a date out of the air and said this is traditional and that is modern.
 

nottskev

Well-known member
I get the impression that for some anglers, "traditional" means imitating a style, in tackle and dress, that used to be used by others in the past. For me, "traditional" means I still like to fish much as I and others did when I started, and the commercial revolution has passed me by.

Apart from tackle and methods, I'd say I like to fish in traditional places - I regularly drive past some popular, busy commercials and arrive at rivers, gravel pits or lakes which are quite likely to be empty or nearly so.
I'm drawn to all kinds of "real world" places, and alongside the idyllic rural spots I also happily fish next to bridges, or under them, opposite factories and buildings, in boatyards, by locks and sluices...... I like places that have features, character and the feel of a bit of history. The fisheries I drive past to get there often hold a lot more fish, but I don't enjoy the bland, recently made landscapes or those sorry pools with their "islands" the size of a large rug and the banks bare apart from some scabby grass in the edges. They don't seem "traditional" at all to me.
 

mikench

Well-known member
Some very good and thought provoking posts there and that Aknib fella looks to be a half decent recruit to the forum.:rolleyes:

I really enjoy my fishing forays despite even being fairly useless and a bit too long in the tooth to radically improve. The key word there is enjoy. Trying a new rod or reel or a handmade float, discovering a new venue, swim or method, particularly if it is simple, is a joy. I have bought several older rods from a variety of manufacturers and derive satisfaction and enjoyment from using them. I will continue to add to my collection including innovative designs made with the finest materials rather than cheap mass produced variants. I could not , for example , bring myself to buy a beast master, battle zone, carp method rod and cannot see the point when there are some wonderful rods to be had.

Being a sad so and so, I like a rod in a quality bag, a cordura tube or well made case, and those aesthetics add to the enjoyment of use and ownership for me. Foolishly I tend to keep some rods like a Sunday best suit , not wanting to use them in muddy conditions, difficult swims, less salubrious locations or where they might be damaged. I do try to give them all an outing and enjoy( an over used word) considering beforehand where I'm going to fish, how I'm going to fish and which Tackle I plan to use. It's all part of the fun and anticipation of a days fishing much like perusing a menu from ones favourite curry house and trying to decide what to have.

Throughout life I have found the anticipation no less enjoyable than the actual event.
 
Last edited:

rayner

Well-known member
Traditional, you're having a laugh.
No such thing. OK, you see some using old substandard out dated tackle. I know it's their choice, I could understand if they were using lines and floats/hooks of the same era. Accept it things have progressed for the better.
Vintage tackle is OK I suppose if it could be displayed in some way, why anyone would want to return to the old ways is beyond me.
To use it would drive me round the twist.
There's enough rubbish about without resurrecting old rubbish.
 
Top