What rod do I need?

reesb88

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Hi all,

I started coarse fishing a few months back and was gifted a basic set up (carp rod and reel with some floats and shots).
Since then I’ve been float fishing using sweet corn/luncheon meat and maggots as bait, and managed to catch a couple of carps and some perch as well.
As the days have gotten colder, I’ve blanked the last few sessions I’ve been out and am now contemplating investing in another rod set up. I’ve been trying to read up but the amount of information is overwhelming and I’m still not sure what I should go for.

My aim is to continue using a rod for float fishing but also have one set up using a feeder. Does anyone have any recommendations on what type of rod/set up I should use?
 

David Rogers 3

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Back in the 1960s and early 70s, a carp rod usually meant a 10', 1.5lb test curve rod in split cane or hollow glass, suited to lines between 6-12lb b.s. These days, it can mean anything from a 10-12' pellet waggler designed for commercial carp fishing, all the way up to a 13', 3.5lb test curve distance casting tool. I wonder what sort of rod you have been given? Depending on the size of carp you're expecting to catch, the sort of rod called something like a "commercial power waggler" would probably be a good all-rounder for float or light legering. Most of the major tackle companies do a range of these and also 10-11' feeder rods that come with a couple of interchangeable quiver tips. They're all quite similar and usually can be bought for around £50. The best advice, although not possible at the moment thanks to Covid, is to ask at your nearest tackle shop, telling them where you intend to fish and for what species.
 

whitty

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David is right,also a proper carp rod would be totally unsuitable for general float fishing,like using a shovel to sweep the yard....
 

reesb88

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Back in the 1960s and early 70s, a carp rod usually meant a 10', 1.5lb test curve rod in split cane or hollow glass, suited to lines between 6-12lb b.s. These days, it can mean anything from a 10-12' pellet waggler designed for commercial carp fishing, all the way up to a 13', 3.5lb test curve distance casting tool. I wonder what sort of rod you have been given? Depending on the size of carp you're expecting to catch, the sort of rod called something like a "commercial power waggler" would probably be a good all-rounder for float or light legering. Most of the major tackle companies do a range of these and also 10-11' feeder rods that come with a couple of interchangeable quiver tips. They're all quite similar and usually can be bought for around £50. The best advice, although not possible at the moment thanks to Covid, is to ask at your nearest tackle shop, telling them where you intend to fish and for what species.
It’s a 12” 2.75lb test curve. 3 section carbon fibre. Should this definitely not be used with a float then?

I’ve just purchased the following which I aim to use as a feeder rod, but I assume it can also be used with floats if needed?

 

David Rogers 3

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Not saying it's impossible to use your 2.75lb rod for float fishing, but it would be completely unbalanced, unless you were using it with say, a 12lb b.s. line for double-figure carp in the margins. Your Omni rod could be pressed into service for float fishing, but again not really suited to it and on the short side for proper control. If you can't get advice from an experienced angler, there are plenty of instructional articles and videos on the internet that will help you. Like this:
 

Badgerale

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You can use most rods to do most things, so i wouldn't get overly worried about it.

However a 2.75 test curve rod is typically used for targeting big fish (15lb+ carp and pike). For catching smaller fish it will feel a bit unresponsive - like a broom handle. Whether you are float fishing or ledgering is a secondary consideration to the size of fish you are after. On lighter tackle you will find that you feel the fish pull more, and things generally feel more responsive.

Having said that, it sounds like you are fishing a commercial fishery (a lake with day tickets) which does provide a bit of a dilemma in that they tend to have a carp focus which can make what I think of as a 'newbie' set up of light tackle a bit risky. In fact, a friend of mine asked advice in a tackle shop for his first set up and came out with a light float rod and 4lb line - which may in the past be suitable for catching roach in a local canal but isn't really how most people cut their teeth these days on a carp filled 'commie'.

It really depends on what size fish you think you'll catch, but generally I think somewhere in the middle is probably best, a 11ft feeder rod with 8lb line would be strong enough to land all but the biggest carp and be responsive enough so that you can get more sport from smaller fish. It would also serve for feeder and float fishing.
 
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corixa

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If you have access to YouTube check out Bill Allan "Easy Fishing". He goes through all types of fishing methods and the tackle required. Aimed for beginners and youngster's.
 

reesb88

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You can use most rods to do most things, so i wouldn't get overly worried about it.

However a 2.75 test curve rod is typically used for targeting big fish (15lb+ carp and pike). For catching smaller fish it will feel a bit unresponsive - like a broom handle. Whether you are float fishing or ledgering is a secondary consideration to the size of fish you are after. On lighter tackle you will find that you feel the fish pull more, and things generally feel more responsive.

Having said that, it sounds like you are fishing a commercial fishery (a lake with day tickets) which does provide a bit of a dilemma in that they tend to have a carp focus which can make what I think of as a 'newbie' set up of light tackle a bit risky. In fact, a friend of mine asked advice in a tackle shop for his first set up and came out with a light float rod and 4lb line - which may in the past be suitable for catching roach in a local canal but isn't really how most people cut their teeth these days on a carp filled 'commie'.

It really depends on what size fish you think you'll catch, but generally I think somewhere in the middle is probably best, a 11ft feeder rod with 8lb line would be strong enough to land all but the biggest carp and be responsive enough so that you can get more sport from smaller fish. It would also serve for feeder and float fishing.
Thanks! I’ve purchased this rod (11ft) along with 8lb mono line and some gripmesh feeders/PVA bags. I like the idea of float fishing but will probably move more towards feeder. Hopefully this set up would be ok.
I also purchased a shimano FXC3000 reel to go with it.

 
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reesb88

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If you have access to YouTube check out Bill Allan "Easy Fishing". He goes through all types of fishing methods and the tackle required. Aimed for beginners and youngster's.
Cheers, I’ll take a look.
 
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john step

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What you have to remember that when it gets cold the fishing can be hard. No, forget that very very hard.
Just check the How Did You Get On thread here on FM! Boy o boy can we blank.

I would say dont spend any more money until the weather bucks up and you can maybe take a few walks round your intended fisheries and at a distance without being too intrusive watch what other do and the type of rods they use. Some will be helpful. Some will be grumpy. Thats life.

In the meantime do the Youtube thing with emphasis on beginners stuff.
 

Keith M

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I tend to agree with John on this matter. You would probably be better advised to talk to the other fisherman around your lake and see what they are all using. Or ask at the local fishing tackle shop.

It’s a 12” 2.75lb test curve. 3 section carbon fibre. Should this definitely not be used with a float then?

You say that you currently use a float with a 2.75lb test curve Carp rod but I personally wouldn’t use a 2.75lb Carp rod for fishing a waggler or any other type of ordinary float as It would be seriously over gunned and be just like using a garden spade to stir my cup of coffee; plus it would be seriously limiting my casting ability when casting a float; and it would just not be capable of cushioning any sudden fish movements without putting my hook hold under severe pressure especially when using smaller hooks and baits, and after striking I would probably be liable to finding a pair of lips on my hook and nothing else :)

The only floats that I would use with such a rod would be surface fishing controllers, although a 2.75lb Carp rod is still a bit overgunned for this and a 2lb test curve (or thereabouts) rod would probably be a bit more suited to casting surface controller floats in my opinion..

If I am using a float for Carp I tend to use a 12ft Commercial float rod which I can use with lines between around 3lb up to around 8lb (or a little over); and which I’ve often caught fish way into double figures on.

At a push you could always use a light Barbel rod with both a Quivertip and an Avon type tip section which you could use for both fishing on the bottom with feeders/straight leads or fishing the float (when using the Avon type tip section).

Anyway I hope that you find what you need.

Tight lines
Keith
 
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