At long last !

flightliner

Well-known member
At long last the River Don in Sheffield has turned up its first rod caught salmon after decades of severe pollution.
Thirty plus years of EA improvements have helped this come about, wonderful news and one I was predicting only a few short weeks ago on the hdygo thread.
Maybe a little sooner than I hoped for but no matter---- it's finally happened-- so happy !!!
 

flightliner

Well-known member
Bullet, not much but it was in the local evening paper accompanied by a foto of it held by the chapter.
It looked big (ish) but maybe not ten lbs but I could be very wrong on that score.
It was taken on a small lure apparently.
Industry long past had impassable wiers constructed that impeded the passage of migratory fish but passes have been constructed to enable them to do so.
Hope it's the start of a long line of salmon and maybe sea trout, who knows?
Long may it continue!
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
Be careful what you wish for. On other Yorkshire rivers, where salmon and sea trout have returned or increased, landowners have had a nasty habit of trying to really turn the screw with rents. Whilst my natural reaction is to welcome the return, I know it's a double edged sword.
 

David Gane

Well-known member
I just hope that in a few months we're not all sitting here reading about how some pillock has "accidentally" dumped a load of toxic chemicals in the water and killed them all off again.
 

flightliner

Well-known member
Be careful what you wish for. On other Yorkshire rivers, where salmon and sea trout have returned or increased, landowners have had a nasty habit of trying to really turn the screw with rents. Whilst my natural reaction is to welcome the return, I know it's a double edged sword.
A big fear already expressed Chris tho thro Sheffield and towardsRotherham there is the five wiers walk that I believe to be council controlled that could be a saving grace for much of it
 

bullet

Well-known member
Agree,Sam, and once the rents go up they never come down, especially on rivers that historically had good runs that have now diminished to virtually nothing.
 

Mark Wintle

Well-known member
You need a substantial and sustained run of salmon to make salmon fishing rights worthwhile. Here in Dorset the salmon runs on two local rivers, the Stour (about 70 salmon still run a year) and Piddle (much diminished) are low enough to mean that salmon fishing more or less stopped on the Stour nearly 50 years ago and on the Piddle there seems to be almost no salmon fishing activity anymore, certainly I haven't seen anyone after them for decades and |I know that one fishery struggled to get more than 3 or 4 anglers for at least 30 years and the fisheries above where I saw salmon anglers fishing in the 60s no longer have anglers.
 

flightliner

Well-known member
I can almost hear the response to a guy telling an angler on some parts of the Don that the stretch is now private or worse still syndicated.
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
You might need good runs for salmon and sea trout anglers to pay through the nose, but it only takes the odd fish for landowners to attempt to extract rent increases on the back of them.
 

stripey

Well-known member
Be careful what you wish for. On other Yorkshire rivers, where salmon and sea trout have returned or increased, landowners have had a nasty habit of trying to really turn the screw with rents. Whilst my natural reaction is to welcome the return, I know it's a double edged sword.
a few weeks ago i wrote on this forum about Salmon on the trent,and had the same concerns has yourself and got mostly negative replies [ i e don't be too concerned riperian owners will not increase there rents] i thought then what a load of ****, now you have made me think that i was right all along, rent / leases will go up more and more to attract the Salmon fishing elite.
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
a few weeks ago i wrote on this forum about Salmon on the trent,and had the same concerns has yourself and got mostly negative replies [ i e don't be too concerned riperian owners will not increase there rents] i thought then what a load of ****, now you have made me think that i was right all along, rent / leases will go up more and more to attract the Salmon fishing elite.
I wouldn't worry unduly for a while. Landowners might try it on, but that doesn't mean that anyone has to pay. Chances are that swathes of the lower and middle reaches won't be particularly appealing to game anglers even if large numbers of migratory salmonids were present.
 
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