float ledger ..

associatedmatt

Well-known member
I was suggested by a angler at work me being 30 and him in 60's suggested to try float ledger .

I never looked into how that works but is it the same as having a sliding lead behind swivel for hooklink and then a sliding float with a sliding stop knott ?

never thought to fish like this before .

thanks
 
B

binka

Guest
That's pretty much the bones of it Matt, you don't have to use a slider rig for the float you can just fix it at depth if it's within a manageable distance from the lead.

Just rig up as you would normally and use the lead as the plummet if you're using a fixed float, you might find that you have to add an inch or two on if the tow or swell is knocking the float over.

I prefer to float leger when I'm perching and it's too windy to keep the float in position with lead shot on the deck, I think the float leger is more free-running than lead dragging along the bottom when you get a bite.
 

associatedmatt

Well-known member
Well the water is around 9ft deep thats why had thought of a sliding stop knot . when fish takes bait and pulls the line through the lead and float dips i see it as , useful with stop knot it bottom isnt uniform or trying different areas i see it as .

thanks
 
B

binka

Guest
I would go with a slider too in that depth considering how much of the length of the average size rod is taken out under the load of netting a fish.

It's worth looking at the Polaris type of floats that Chris mentioned above if you're searching around as they find their own depth without the need to plumb up, if you do a quick search there's loads on here about them and a fair bit you Youtube.
 

associatedmatt

Well-known member
Is there one that works better polaris or lockslide ?

i have a polaris and yes it works well but not caught anything but it was a hard day when used it and had 2 out in the morning but showed me there good to use but not found out what the bite indication is like .

Thanks guys
 
B

binka

Guest
Is there one that works better polaris or lockslide ?
I've never used either Matt, or any other variation of them.

I just the conventional float leger set up but people seem to speak quite well of the Polaris type of floats.
 

associatedmatt

Well-known member
All i can do is give it a try , far too often you just fish methods you know and have most confidence in .

I may try it this weekend .

Thanks
 

trotter2

Well-known member
I sometimes float ledger on a River if the flow is too strong for laying on.

It can work well on a Stillwater for species like tench and bream had some good days with it:thumbs:;).
 

shane99

Well-known member
Using the polaris worked well for me when fishing a very deep margined gravel pit. Simple to use which suits simple me. I think of them as one of the best forms of indication when ledgering and you get to watch a float :)

They are not for every one but it did solve my problem.
 

Tee-Cee

Senior Member
Now I may well be quite wrong with the current 'recognised' principals around the term 'laying-on' but I want to say how this term came into my fishing back in the late 1950's, and what I perceive is 'the way' to fish the method. Obviously, I realise many of the differing approaches mentioned above are very similar but to my mind 'laying-on' has only ever meant one fixed way of fishing...

Be patient...

As a very young man (teenager actually) I joined several clubs which enabled me to get to rivers such as the Thames along its entire length. Some of the older, very experienced members were always prepared to help me with methods and one of these kindly souls suggested laying-on to catch fish on the bottom particularly with the 14' 'match rod much in use in those days.

Generally speaking, it consisted of two principal items: A longish porcupine quill float fixed top and bottom and a 1/4" dia lead bullet. The float was slid up the line followed by the bullet, and the hook tied on. A stop shot was then applied some distance from the hook (usually) 6/12" and that was it.
The whole lot was cast out a distance, not much more than the end of the rod, and if the float shot under it was move upward until it lay flat on the surface (in other words, overdepth). The rod was then placed in the rod rest and the line tightened until the float just cocked.
The rod then stayed in the rest and the strike was made from the rest in one movement, and not lifted before the strike. Many times the float just disappeared in a flash anyway and the tip occasionally pulled round, so it was very concentrated way of fishing. It worked very well for decent roach and quick bites could sometimes be remedied by moving the shot.

I'm aware this explanation suggests something similar to the lift method and indeed other methods, but my method always included a rolling bullet and it was the only way I ever saw it fished, AND it was only ever known as 'laying-on'. I would agree the rod length/depth of water is the guiding factor in its use, but in (up to 8/9' of water) with good distance between float and bullet ( to avoid line bites) it could mean the difference between ziltch and a few roach in matches.

Not for one moment am I say the term is misused these days and variations to a theme will always crop up, but back some 50 years this was the way it was fished - in my circles!

I still use it today from time to time and find it 'better' than using a Polaris type float or the lift method for that matter - in certain situations such as close in where minimal casting and the bait fixed in one place, it can produce good fish!

ps The size of the bullet was dependent on the flow in running water.....
 
Last edited:

peterjg

Well-known member
I used to think that float legering caused too much resistance because of the angles created but actually it can be quite efficient.

It's nice to watch a float instead of a tip or bobbin.

You can either loose feed or groundbait more accurately because you have a float (or just past it) to aim for.

You can use either a bomb or feeder.

It's hardly a new method, Bill Penny in 1938 caught the then roach record of 3lbs 14ozs float legering and he also caught another 3lb roach on the same day!
 

associatedmatt

Well-known member
Thanks all nice bit of info there , just see the Polaris as a modern version of the more traditional way .

I will give it a go as a resivior I fish is 20ft of the dam wall !


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

tigger

Well-known member
Now I may well be quite wrong with the current 'recognised' principals around the term 'laying-on' but I want to say how this term came into my fishing back in the late 1950's, and what I perceive is 'the way' to fish the method. Obviously, I realise many of the differing approaches mentioned above are very similar but to my mind 'laying-on' has only ever meant one fixed way of fishing...

Be patient...

As a very young man (teenager actually) I joined several clubs which enabled me to get to rivers such as the Thames along its entire length. Some of the older, very experienced members were always prepared to help me with methods and one of these kindly souls suggested laying-on to catch fish on the bottom particularly with the 14' 'match rod much in use in those days.

Generally speaking, it consisted of two principal items: A longish porcupine quill float fixed top and bottom and a 1/4" dia lead bullet. The float was slid up the line followed by the bullet, and the hook tied on. A stop shot was then applied some distance from the hook (usually) 6/12" and that was it.
The whole lot was cast out a distance, not much more than the end of the rod, and if the float shot under it was move upward until it lay flat on the surface (in other words, overdepth). The rod was then placed in the rod rest and the line tightened until the float just cocked.
The rod then stayed in the rest and the strike was made from the rest in one movement, and not lifted before the strike. Many times the float just disappeared in a flash anyway and the tip occasionally pulled round, so it was very concentrated way of fishing. It worked very well for decent roach and quick bites could sometimes be remedied by moving the shot.

I'm aware this explanation suggests something similar to the lift method and indeed other methods, but my method always included a rolling bullet and it was the only way I ever saw it fished, AND it was only ever known as 'laying-on'. I would agree the rod length/depth of water is the guiding factor in its use, but in (up to 8/9' of water) with good distance between float and bullet ( to avoid line bites) it could mean the difference between ziltch and a few roach in matches.

Not for one moment am I say the term is misused these days and variations to a theme will always crop up, but back some 50 years this was the way it was fished - in my circles!

I still use it today from time to time and find it 'better' than using a Polaris type float or the lift method for that matter - in certain situations such as close in where minimal casting and the bait fixed in one place, it can produce good fish!

ps The size of the bullet was dependent on the flow in running water.....


That's exactly how I would describe laying on when fishing a river TC. The same set up when used on a still water is just float legering.
When laying on i've used either a bomb as you describe or a loop of line with shot added, these shot can be added to or removed to get the desired effect. When trotting and the tide has come in causing a halt to the trotting and if i'm being a little lazy i've just left my shot bulked and pushed them down to my bottom shot and it's worked just the same even with small fish,. It's surprising how much weight a small fish will drag off or even lift up in the water!
 

trotter2

Well-known member
Its a lovely way to fish and takes some monsters sometimes which you would not know where in the swim unless you tried it.
My way of float ledger is a bit different,I use the same method as billy lane in his books. Its basically a paternoster rig.
 

john step

Well-known member
Its a lovely way to fish and takes some monsters sometimes which you would not know where in the swim unless you tried it.
My way of float ledger is a bit different,I use the same method as billy lane in his books. Its basically a paternoster rig.

Yes I find the use of a paternoster gets better bites.
I read in a book by Ivan marks that was what he recommended.

He said to try an experiment thus...

Rig up a paternoster rig and lay it out on your lawn.
Now pull the hook as if a fish was taking the bait.
The indicator would register a bite before the lead would be moved.

he was talking swing tip but the same would apply to a quiver tip and also float ledgering??
 
Last edited:

associatedmatt

Well-known member
I googled paternoster rig and all I can find is multiple hook rigs anyone care to explain or a picture would be good how to set one up please .


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

flightliner

Well-known member
I reckon me and tiggers mentors were all related method wise with the exception of mine showing me how on stillwaters, notably a pond behind a working mens club on the outskirts of Sheffields north side.
For us it was always an autumn/winter method with lobworm for the waters big roach after a summer using wasp grub when they were so easily drawn up in the water.
 
Top