Food for Thought

Aknib

Well-known member
It was the ‘Line for trotting’ thread which raised these questions, they’ve occurred to me before in my subconscious when reading certain threads but something hit home this time around and in turn caused them to bubble to the surface.

I’m always amazed at how many Anglers prefer so many different lines for different disciplines, having been there myself my own approach now is to use one reliable all-rounder that I know I can rely on and I can then concentrate my thoughts on other things such as location, conditions, fish behaviour, bait etc. without worrying if the line or any other part of the tackle is ‘the best’ for that particular aspect.

I should say that I’m prepared (and actively look) to make certain trade-offs in order to simplify my fishing and I doff my hat to those who consider and implement everything down to the last letter but I have to admit that I don’t and I still feel like I’ve had a seat at the table.

My general stillwater waggler rod is also my general river trotting rod and it’s remarkably convenient.

There’s no right or wrong to all this, I doubt I catch more or bigger or better but I do get my fair share which prompts me to wonder…

How much tangible difference do all our personal preferences actually make, is it the tackle or is it the Angler?

Many variables of course so I ask that question in the context of a level playing field.

Is it just personal preference and a general feeling of pleasure, knowing that we’re using the ‘right’ tool for the job and the ease of use which it might portray or do we make whatever we have to hand work just the same to really produce the same or, even better results?

And which is more gratifying?


A battered old car will often get you to your destination as will the expensive saloon, but was the saloon simply more comfortable and not more productive?

Same for spliced tip rods for trotting, fluted floats, reel choice, lure colour etc. etc., in fact any item of fishing tackle for any aspect of fishing.

If you apply all the niche tweaks to your tackle, does the end justify the means?

What d’ya reckon?
 

s63

Well-known member
I reckon you should tell us your all rounder line, I hope it ain’t Sensor, that will have this thread going on past the close season.:)
 

sam vimes

Well-known member
Like so many things in angling, it's almost impossible to be definitive. You try a new bait and have a good day. Was it down to the new bait or would you have done just as well, if not better, on another bait? Even the regular match anglers, that at least have regular weighed catches and fellow competitors to help quantify things, will struggle to be sure that using a different rod, line, float, hook, bait etc has definitely improved their lot.

However, you can quantify some things. Some of them matter, some don't. You can definitely get lighter rods and reels. Provided the balance and action suit, they should definitely be "better" than the same rod or reel that just happened to be heavier. Provided the heavier items aren't ridiculously heavy, you may not catch any fewer fish, but it will be harder work to do so. You can definitely get longer, shorter or more powerful rods that can make some methods or situations possible, or easier, to fish.

Ultimately, only the individual concerned can determine whether all the fuss and expenditure is worthwhile. If they think so, and they get some enjoyment from it all, so be it. The end does justify the means. Provided they don't get round to believing that having a load of gear somehow makes them a brilliant angler. all is good. All it makes them is the same standard as they were but with loads of kit. It might mean that they are equipped for almost any circumstance imaginable though.
 

wetthrough

Well-known member
I don't believe the tackle makes a great deal of difference to my catch rate but having tackle that feels right just makes the experience more pleasurable and to an extent less frustrating. The line never goes inside the CI4+ spool and it feels good - well engineered. I tend to get tip wraps with the 11' Matchpro Ultra Light and 13' Vertex, the latter particularly so. The two Greys float and 13' Altima match light hardly ever tip wrap. My catch rate probably has improved since I got back into fishing but I think it's more down to picking conditions, location and getting better (I hope) at feeding, I use much the same bait as I've always done.
 

nottskev

Well-known member
I sometimes wish I'd contrived to have fewer, more versatile rods, reels, poles, even. There's always a little bit of nuisance and stress (have I packed the right stuff?) in getting ready to go out, especially if you try to minimise what you carry and you go fishing to some very different places.

Equally, it's nice to have the gear that's just the job for the water, method, species you're after, especially if you like to fish light and get the most "feel' out of whatever you're doing or catching.

I've not really squared that circle, and my habit of keeping the old stuff I like,rather than trading it in for anything new, means there's a fair bit of gear to choose from, I'm often scratching my head over what to take. I can believe, though, that if you've homed in on some quality gear that's got real versatility designed in, the streamlining must be welcome.

If pushed, I'd say it's probably their overall angling skill rather than their gear that affects people's catches, much as Messi is probably more important than his boots. But as soon as I've said that, it occurs to me the connection between gear and fishing well may be a dialectical one (the chain wears the sprocket and the sprocket wears the chain) - maybe we fish better, more keenly or more optimistically when we're using the gear we really fancy?
 

theartist

Well-known member
I drive a battered old car to fish with my battered old gear

The thing people in new shiny cars sometimes don't realise is that it's battered and old for a reason and that reason is it's still going strong and is reliable.

Battered old gear is the same, any marginal gain made by shiny new gear is easily offset by learning what the fish are doing under the water. Best bit of kit anyone can invest in is Polarizing sunnies and time, If you got something you enjoy using, use it till the damn thing breaks
 

mikench

Well-known member
Most of my kit is too good for me and probably always will be but I like it and like having a good choice. I like the anticipation/ quandary as to which venue, method, rods, reels, bait and even clothing I will use next.

I don't wear the same shirt all the time, frequent the same restaurant or takeaway, read the same kind of books, take the same walks, cook the same meals, drink the same wines or beers. I like a nice car but no longer waste large sums on it.

If the concensus was that a particular rod , reel and line would suit all circumstances then I would buy it or them but as additions to what I have already or until the next consensus:cool:
 

spoonminnow

Well-known member
When we get too smart for our own good and overthink in the process, we make simple things needlessly complicated, and our productivity suffers as a result. Half the problem with many anglers is believing everything they read on forums/ magazines or watch on TV. Rather than be defensive of their gullibility, they would do well to follow this advice:
my own approach now is to use one reliable all-rounder that I know I can rely on and I can then concentrate my thoughts on other things such as location, conditions, fish behaviour, bait etc. without worrying if the line or any other part of the tackle is ‘the best’ for that particular aspect.
combined with :
Is it just personal preference and a general feeling of pleasure, knowing that we’re using the ‘right’ tool for the job and the ease of use which it might portray or do we make whatever we have to hand work just the same to really produce the same or, even better results?
In my own case, the challenge as anyone knows having read my posts is that lure designs intrigue me regardless the lure category. The rod/reel/line I use is versatile for small to medium size fish of most species and performs the basics very well: lure manipulation, hook sets and fighting fish from strike to net. I have a checklist of stuff I want on board and it doesn't vary, with an MP3 player and pipe tobacco at the top of the list. (Talk about zoning out when fishing...)

If I see someone catch fish with a lure I've never cast, of course I want to know how it was used and the particulars such as what size, action, presentation, etc. But that's just curiosity of one more lure of 1,000 others that can catch fish equal to what I already know catch fish.

Fishing is a puzzle which I prefer to find the answers to based on trial & error and my experience(s). But in order to do that, simple is as simple does comes to mind, including staying with what I feel will get the job done.

(BTW - I still drive a 1995 Toyota Camry along with other later model vehicles - all which get me where I want to go.)
 
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