Surface Hooklengths

C

Carp Angler

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What type and length of line do you use for surface fishing?
 

GrahamM

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Fluorocarbon with the shine just, and only just, removed with a small wad of fine wire wool, and as long a length as I can manage to cast comfortably, which is usually about 8ft. Sometimes I'll fish a longer surface hooklength by coiling it up and tying it with PVA string.
 
C

Carp Angler

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I personally use Silstar Match Team or Berkeley Sensi-Thin of between 4 and 6 feet and I have never felt the need to go below 10lb BS. I haven't come across a flouro that I feel would benefit my surface fishing, any suggestions of brands anyone?
 
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BUDGIE BURGESS

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Exactly the same as Graham but with the last 18" thoroughly degreased.
 
C

Carp Angler

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I tend to de-grease with wet marginal mud, another other tricks/tips anyone?
 
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Philip Inzani

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I use Kryston multistrand for floaters but have been thinking about using flurocarbon. Not sure if its a different debate but I have read/heard some contradictory advice about wheter to try and get the hooklength to sink below the surface film rather than on it with floaters...I dont know...can anyone help?
 
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BUDGIE BURGESS

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I always use a paste made from Fullers earth and washing up liquid.Fullers earth is available from most chemists.I learn't about this from my trout fishing.Have you wondered why fish (carp or trout) often shy away from your surface bait at the last minute? This is due to what is known to trout anglers as FNS(floating nylon syndrome)the nylon floating on the surface casts a shadow.If you degrease the last few inches of line you can avoid this.Obviously if it sinks too far this may also spook the fish by touching them but I have found this to be the lesser of the two evils.
 

GrahamM

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I degrease the last 12 ins or so, but the long hooklength can be very effective where the carp are wary of controllers. The greater the distance between bait and controller the less spooked they are. Like many of the debates on this forum, however, each individual water has a bearing on what techniques work best.
 
J

Jon Moores

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It's got to be Flouro for surface baits. Most of my surface fishing is freelining, so I just add 18 inches of flouro to my main line, degreasing it if necessary with fullers earth and washing up liquid. BTW The mainline is treated with greased lightning which is fabulous for floater fishing, making it float like a cork as well as helping a little with casting. (good for stick float fishing too)
 
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Philip Inzani

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...Trying to learn here...so it looks like sinking the last few inches of the hooklength is the preferred choice, what about the hook ?....I have tried messing about with bits of weight stuck in the bait to make it flip over and leave the hook above the surface out of view but is there a better way...does it even matter ?
 
A

Andrew Miller

Guest
Slighly off the subject but my problem with surface fishing is the carp keep pulling my controller under. So they definitely not scared of the controller! Is this normal (or is it the carp have a sense of humour and like to scared me instead!)
 
C

Carp Angler

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greased lightning, fantastic.... I've never had a problem with fish spooking from the controller, most of the time they try to eat the darn thing. I use the little Drennan ones, which I colour with a black marker pen (just in case). Only way I've found to keep the line out of the water is when fishing crust and threading the hook in from the crusty side, turning it back on itself on the fluffy side, so the eye of the hook is on the top. That doesn't read right, I'll show a picture when I do a surface article......
 
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BUDGIE BURGESS

Guest
Yes I have the same problem,maybe we should use controllers on the hook instead of mixers or crust!
 
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Jon Moores

Guest
I used to occasionally use huge dog biscuits or a big bakey as a hookbait when the fish were in a 'curious' mood and this often got takes in the way a controller does. The trick was not to use any of these as freebies, as that way the curiosity value was lost. The fish didn't actually eat them, even freebies were usually spat out after a while. It seemed weird though, struggling for a take on a mixer then having them wolf down a bait that looks more like a pike float.
 
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